Skip to content

Lee and His Men at Gettysburg The Death of a Nation

Spend $50 to get a free movie!

ISBN-10: 1616083530

ISBN-13: 9781616083533

Edition: 2011

Authors: Clifford Dowdey

List price: $14.95
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

In this sweeping account Clifford Dowdey recreates one of the most important battles in U.S. history. With vivid and breathtaking detail, Lee and His Men at Gettysburg is both a historical work and an honorary ode to the almost fifty thousand soldiers who died at the fields of Pennsylvania. Written with an emphasis on the Confederate forces, the book captures the brilliance and frustration of a general forced to contend with overwhelming odds and incompetent subordinates. Dowdey not only presents the facts of war, but brings to life the cast of characters that defined this singular moment in American history.
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $14.95
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date: 9/13/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 416
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Clifford Dowdey (1904-1979) was an American writer, best known for his fascination with the Civil War and southern American history. A native of Richmond, Virginia, Dowdey lived and worked in almost every region of the United States before returning back to his home state. He published his first bestseller, Bugles Blow No More , in 1937 and would write over thirty-five books throughout his career. He died in Richmond in 1979.

Rendezvous with Disaster
The Opening Phase
"We Must all Do More Than Formerly"
"All is Vanity"
"And Then A. P. Hill Came Up"
"The Good Soldier"
"Lee's Warhorse"
"Pickett's Charge"
A Note On Sources and Selected Bibliography
Appendix
Index
Maps
The Campaign
The Scene of Battle
The First Day: July 1,1863
The Second Day: July 2,1863
The Third Day: July 3,1863