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Myths and Shibboleths in Nephrology

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ISBN-10: 1402006160

ISBN-13: 9781402006166

Edition: 2002

Authors: Eli A. Friedman, Iram Anees

List price: $59.99
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Description:

Increasingly, medicine in general and nephrology specifically is based on clinical trials and verifiable presumption. Still, however, much of everyday clinical practice is the consensus of pundits and experts unable to validate their suggestions beyond personal bias. In this unique volume, several core beliefs in renal medicine are examined and challenged. Starting as assignments for nephrology fellows, this book grew out of surprising `revelations' indicating that `the emperor has no clothes'. The book is suitable as a stimulus for provocative discussions for nephrologists, internists, house staff, and medical students.
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Book details

List price: $59.99
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: Springer
Publication date: 6/30/2002
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 74
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.396
Language: English

Dedication
Foreword
Preface
Contributors
Urinary tract infection can lead to end stage renal disease (ESRD)
Kidney donation does not jeopardize function in the remaining kidney
Hypertension imposes a risk of chronic kidney failure
Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) are superior to other antihypertensive drugs because of their renoprotective properties
Dietary protein restriction slows progression of renal insufficiency
Plasmapheresis is beneficial in some renal disorders
Urinary tract infection is more prevalent in diabetes
Type 1 diabetes is more likely than type 2 diabetes to lead to nephropathy and ESRD
Pharmacological strategies may prevent acute tubular necrosis (ATN)
Intravenous iron may be hazardous in infected hemodialysis patients
Peritoneal dialysis is equivalent to hemodialysis
Rationing of ESRD treatment is an unavoidable reality
Tacrolimus is superior to cyclosporine in renal transplantation
Dialyzer re-use is safe and cost effective
Living related pancreas after kidney transplantation is preferable to cadaveric simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation
Administration of active vitamin D metabolites is beneficial in patients with advanced chronic renal failure (pre end-stage renal disease)
Surgical intervention and prompt nephrectomy are preferred in emphysematous pyelonephritis
Mortality in chronic hemodialysis is greater in the U.S. than in Europe and Japan
A single hemodialysis treatment prevents uremic bleeding and restores platelet function
Kidney biopsy is indicated in every care of lupus nephritis
Indicators of glycemic control in diabetic ESRD patients should be equivalent to those utilized in earlier stages of diabetic nephropathy
Fish oil is effective therapy for IgA nephropathy
Physician assistants should replace nephrologists in dialysis units
Patients with severe cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) require long-term bladder catheters
Pre-transplant blood transfusions enhance renal allograft survival
Hemoperfusion is superior to hemodialysis in the treatment of certain poisonings and/or drug overdoses
Epilogue