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Economy-Security Nexus in Northeast Asia

ISBN-10: 1138851841

ISBN-13: 9781138851849

Edition: 2013

Authors: T. J. Pempel

List price: $39.99
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Description:

The dynamics of Northeast Asia have traditionally been considered primarily in military and hard security terms or alternatively along their economic dimensions. This book argues that relations among the states of Northeast Asia are far more comprehensible when the mutually shaping interactions between economics and security are considered simultaneously. It examines these interactions and some of the key empirical questions they pose, the answers to which have important lessons for international relations beyond Northeast Asia. Contributors to this volume analyze how the states of the region define their 'security', and how bilateral relations in hard security issues and economic linkages play out among Japan, China and the two Koreas. Further, the chapters interrogate how different patterns of techno-nationalist development affect regional security ties, and the extent to which closer economic connections enhance or detract from a nation's self-perceived security. The book concludes by discussing scenarios for the future and the conditions that will shape relations between economics and security in the region. This book will be welcomed by students and scholars of Asian politics, Asian economics, security studies and political economy.
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Book details

List price: $39.99
Copyright year: 2013
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
Publication date: 3/4/2015
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 240
Size: 9.21" wide x 6.14" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.748

T. J. Pempel is Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the coeditor of Crisis as Catalyst: Asia's Dynamic Political Economy , also from Cornell, and Japan in Crisis: What Will It Take for Japan to Rise Again?