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Trust in International Cooperation International Security Institutions, Domestic Politics and American Multilateralism

ISBN-10: 1107603765

ISBN-13: 9781107603769

Edition: 2011

Authors: Brian C. Rathbun

List price: $29.95
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Description:

Trust in International Cooperation challenges conventional wisdoms concerning the part which trust plays in international cooperation and the origins of American multilateralism. Rathbun questions rational institutionalist arguments, demonstrating that trust precedes rather than follows the creation of international organizations. Drawing on social psychology, he shows that individuals placed in the same structural circumstances show markedly different propensities to cooperate based on their beliefs about the trustworthiness of others. Linking this finding to political psychology, Rathbun explains why liberals generally pursue a more multilateral foreign policy than conservatives, evident in the Democratic Party's greater support for a genuinely multilateral League of Nations, United Nations and North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Rathbun argues that the post-Second World War bipartisan consensus on multilateralism is a myth, and differences between the parties are growing continually starker.
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Book details

List price: $29.95
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 12/1/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 274
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.968
Language: English

Circles of trust: reciprocity, community and multilateralism
Anarchical social capital: a social psychological theory of trust, international cooperation and institutional design
The open circle: the failure of the League of Nations
Squaring the circle: the birth of the United Nations
Closing the circle: the negotiation of the North Atlantic Treaty
Coming full circle: fear, terrorism and the future of American multilateralism