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After War Ends A Philosophical Perspective

ISBN-10: 1107603625

ISBN-13: 9781107603622

Edition: 2012

Authors: Larry May

List price: $45.95
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Description:

There is extensive discussion in current Just War literature about the normative principles which should govern the initiation of war (jus ad bellum) and also the conduct of war (jus in bello), but this is the first book to treat the important and difficult issue of justice after the end of war. Larry May examines the normative principles which should govern post-war practices such as reparations, restitution, reconciliation, retribution, rebuilding, proportionality and the Responsibility to Protect. He discusses the emerging international law literature on transitional justice and the problem of moving from a position of war and possible mass atrocity to a position of peace and reconciliation. He questions the Just War tradition, arguing that contingent pacifism is most in keeping with normative principles after war ends. His discussion is richly illustrated with contemporary examples and will be of interest to students of political and legal philosophy, law and military studies.
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Book details

List price: $45.95
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 4/19/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 260
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.924
Language: English

Larry May is W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy, Professor of Law, and Professor of Political Science at Vanderbilt University. He has authored or edited over thirty books, most recently on the topics of war and international criminal law. He teaches courses in philosophy of law and the history of political philosophy.

Introduction: normative principles of jus post bellum
Retribution
Grotius, sovereignty, and the indictment of Al Bashir
Transitional justice and the Just War tradition
War crimes trials during and after war
Reconciliation
Reconciliation of warring parties
Reconciliation and the rule of law
Conflicting responsibilities to protect human rights
Rebuilding
Responsibility to rebuild and collective responsibility
Responsibility to rebuild as a limitation on initiating war
Restitution and Reparation
Restitution and restoration in jus post bellum
A Grotian account of reparations
Proportionality and the End of War
Proportionality and the fog of war