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Cambridge Handbook of Phonology

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ISBN-10: 1107404894

ISBN-13: 9781107404892

Edition: 2012

Authors: Paul de Lacy

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Description:

Phonology - the study of how the sounds of speech are represented in our minds - is one of the core areas of linguistic theory, and is central to the study of human language. This handbook, first published in 2007, brings together the world's leading experts in phonology to present the most comprehensive and detailed overview of the field. Focusing on research and the most influential theories, the authors discuss each of the central issues in phonological theory, explore a variety of empirical phenomena, and show how phonology interacts with other aspects of language such as syntax, morphology, phonetics, and language acquisition. Providing a one-stop guide to every aspect of this important field, The Cambridge Handbook of Phonology will serve as an invaluable source of readings for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, an informative overview for linguists and a useful starting point for anyone beginning phonological research.
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Book details

Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 7/19/2012
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 708
Size: 6.69" wide x 9.61" long x 1.42" tall
Weight: 2.442
Language: English

Introduction: themes in phonology Paul de Lacy
Conceptual Issues
In pursuit of theory
Functionalism
Markedness
Derivations and levels of representation
Representation
Contrast
Prosody
The syllable
Feet and metrical stress
Tone
The phonology of intonation
The interaction of tone, sonority and prosody
Subsegmental Features
Segmental features Tracy
Local assimilation and constraint interaction
Harmony
Dissimilation in grammar and the lexicon
Internal Interfaces
The phonetics-phonology interface
The syntax-phonology interface
Morpheme position
Reduplication
External Interfaces
Diachronic phonology
Variation and optionality
Acquiring phonology
Learnability
Phonological impairment in children and adults