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Realism, Photography and Nineteenth-Century Fiction

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ISBN-10: 0521885256

ISBN-13: 9780521885256

Edition: 2008

Authors: Daniel A. Novak

List price: $115.95
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Description:

This radically new account of the relationship between photography and literary realism in Victorian Britain draws on detailed readings of photographs, writings about photography, and fiction by Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Oscar Wilde. While other critics have argued that photography defined what would be real for literary fiction, Daniel A. Novak demonstrates that photography itself was associated with the unreal with fiction and the literary imagination. Once we acknowledge that manipulation was essential rather than incidental to the project of nineteenth-century realism, our understanding of the relationship between photography and fiction changes in important ways. Novak argues…    
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Book details

List price: $115.95
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 5/1/2008
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 252
Size: 7.00" wide x 10.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.474
Language: English

James V. Catano is a professor of English at Louisiana State University and author of Ragged Dicks: Masculinity, Steel, and the Rhetoric of the Self-Made Man. Daniel A. Novak is an associate professor of English at Louisiana State University and author of Realism, Photography, and Nineteenth-Century Fiction.

List of illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: "detestable introductions"
Missing persons and model bodies: Victorian photographic figures
Composing the novel body: re-membering the body and the text in Little Dorrit
A model Jew: "literary photographs" and the Jewish body in Daniel Deronda
Sexuality in the age of technological reproducibility: Wilde, photography, and identity
After-image: surviving the photograph
Notes
Selected bibliography
Index