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Religious Traditions of Japan, 500-1600

ISBN-10: 052185119X

ISBN-13: 9780521851190

Edition: 2005

Authors: Richard Bowring

List price: $100.99
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Description:

Richard Bowring traces the development of Japanese religious thought and practice from the introduction of writing to the point at which medieval attitudes gave way to a distinctive pre-modern culture, a change that brought an end to the dominance of religious institutions. A wide range of approaches using the resources of art, history, social and intellectual history, as well as doctrine is brought to bear on the subject in order to give as full a picture as possible of the richness of the Japanese tradition and an overview of how Buddhism and Shintõ interacted in Japanese culture.
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Book details

List price: $100.99
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 12/31/2005
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 502
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 2.046
Language: English

Introduction
The Arrival of Buddhism and Its Effects (c.538-800)
The introduction of Buddhism
Creating a dynasty
Buddhism and the early state
Monuments at Nara
From Saicho to the Destruction of Todaiji (800-1180)
The beginnings of a 'Japanese' Buddhism: Tendai
The beginnings of a 'Japanese' Buddhism: Shingon
Buddhism and the state in Heian Japan
Shrine and state in Heian Japan
The rise of devotionalism
A time for strife
From the Destruction of Todaiji to the Fall of Godaigo (1180-1330)
For and against exclusive practice of the nenbutsu
Religious culture of the early 'middle ages'
Chan Buddhism
Zen Buddhism
Reform from within and without
The emergence of Shinto
Taking stock
From the Fall of Godaigo to the Death of Nobunaga (1330-1582)
Two rival courts; Muromachi Zen
The end of the medieval
Appendix: Reading Shingon's two mandala