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Cambridge Companion to Performance Studies

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ISBN-10: 0521696267

ISBN-13: 9780521696265

Edition: 2008

Authors: Tracy C. Davis

List price: $36.99
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Description:

Since the turn of the century, Performance Studies has emerged as an increasingly vibrant discipline. Its concerns - embodiment, ethical research and social change - are held in common with many other fields, however a unique combination of methods and applications is used in exploration of the discipline. Bridging live art practices - theatre, performance art and dance - with technological media, and social sciences with humanities, it is truly hybrid and experimental in its techniques. This Companion brings together specially commissioned essays from leading scholars who reflect on their own experiences in Performance Studies and the possibilities this offers to representations of…    
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Book details

List price: $36.99
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 11/13/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 210
Size: 6.00" wide x 8.75" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.748
Language: English

Introduction: The pirouette, detour, revolution, deflection, deviation, tack, and yaw of the performative turn
Social polities: history in individuals
Performance and democracy
Performance as research: live events and documents
Movement's contagion: the kinesthetic impact of performance
Performance matters: Bali and Baliology in the years of living dangerously
Universal experience: the city as tourist stage
Performance and intangible culture heritage
Body politics: the individual in history
Live and technologically mediated performance
Moving histories: performance and oral history
What is the 'social' in social practice?: comparing experiments in performance
Live art in art history: a paradox?
Queer theory