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Violence, Terrorism, and Justice

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ISBN-10: 0521409500

ISBN-13: 9780521409506

Edition: 1991

Authors: Raymond Gillespie Frey, Christopher W. Morris, Annette C. Baier, Claudia Card, Jonathan Glover

List price: $36.99
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Description:

In this volume a group of distinguished moral and social thinkers address the urgent problem of terrorism. The essays define terrorism, discuss whether the assessment of terrorist violence should be based on its consequences (beneficial or otherwise), and explore what means may be used to combat those who use violence without justification. Among other questions raised by the volume are: What does it mean for a people to be innocent of the acts of their government? May there not be some justification in terrorists targeting certain victims but not others? May terrorist acts be attributed to groups or to states? The collection will be of particular interest to moral and political…    
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Book details

List price: $36.99
Copyright year: 1991
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 8/30/1991
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 332
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.100
Language: English

Annette C. Baier was Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy, Emerita, at the University of Pittsburgh. She also taught at the philosophy department of the University of Otago in New Zealand.

Jonathan Glover is director of the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics at King's College, London.

List of contributors
Preface
Violence, terrorism, and justice
What purposes can "international terrorism" serve?
Violent demonstrations
Terrorism, rights, and political goals
The political significance of terrorism
Terrorism and morality
Which are the offers you can't refuse?
Making exceptions without abandoning the principle: or how a Kantian might think about terrorism
State and private; Red and White
State terrorism
Nuclear hostages
Rape as a terrorist institution