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White Collar Crime Current Perspectives

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ISBN-10: 0495103853

ISBN-13: 9780495103851

Edition: 2008

Authors: Wadsworth, Nicole Leeper Piquero

List price: $57.95
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Description:

Why do people who seem to have everything risk it all for more? And are their cases just instances of individual deviance, or do they represent a more widespread corruption of values? Explore these issues, and more, with CURRENT PERSPECTIVES: READINGS FROM INFOTRAC COLLEGE EDITION: WHITE COLLAR CRIME. Edited by Nicole Leeper Piquero of the University of Florida - Gainesville, this accessible reader includes timely articles on one of the most puzzling criminal phenomenons of our era. The selections examine these questions from a variety of psychological and sociological perspectives. Along with the reader, you receive access to InfoTrac College Edition, which you can use to create your own online reader with InfoMarks.
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Book details

List price: $57.95
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Wadsworth
Publication date: 12/4/2007
Binding: Mixed Media
Pages: 304
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.880
Language: English

Alex R. Piquero is a Professor at the University of Maryland Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Member of the MacArthur Foundation's Research Network on Adolescent Development, and Member of the National Consortium on Violence Research. He is also Executive Counselor of the American Society of Criminology, and is Co-Editor of the Journal of Quantitative Criminology. He received a Ph.D. in Criminology & Criminal Justice from the University of Maryland in 1996, and has received several teaching, research, and mentoring awards, including the American Society of Criminology Young Scholar and E-Mail Mentor of the Year Awards, and a University of Florida Teacher of the Year Award. His research interests include criminal careers, criminological theory, and quantitative research methods. He has published widely in the fields of criminology, criminal justice, psychology, and sociology, and is co-author (with Alfred Blumstein and David Farrington) of a recently published book, Key Issues in Criminal Careers Research.

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