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Life in a Muslim Uzbek Village Cotton Farming after Communism CSCA

ISBN-10: 0495092819

ISBN-13: 9780495092810

Edition: 2011

Authors: Russell Zanca

List price: $26.95
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Description:

LIFE IN A MUSLIM UZBEK VILLAGE: COTTON FARMING AFTER COMMUNISM aims to 'identify and explain aspects of Uzbek cultural life in a farming village on a 'kolkhoz' (collective farm) that account for both cultural patterns and culture change.This case study depicts the cultural changes and continuities that have occurred as a result of Uzbekistan's recent political independence from the Soviet Union. It describes, from the author's own experience and understanding of Uzbek rural life, how the production and global exportation of cotton has brought new challenges and opportunities to contemporary Uzbek citizens.Students will see how vital cotton is to the modern Uzbek way of life as a means through which the people generate the bulk of their country's wealth (and, as a result, their own autocratic society). In light of their changing environs, the people of Uzbekistan have been forced to negotiate a new identity and culture for themselves in relation to their country, their continent, and the rest of the world.
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Book details

List price: $26.95
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Wadsworth
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 192
Size: 6.25" wide x 8.75" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.638
Language: English

Jeff Sahadeo is Assistant Professor, Institute of European and Russian Studies and Department of Political Science, Carleton University, Ottawa. He is author of Russian Colonial Society in Tashkent, 1865--1923 (IUP, 2006).Russell Zanca is Associate Professor of Anthropology at Northeastern Illinois University. He is author of The Big Cotton Collective: Uzbeks after Socialism.

Foreword
Preface
Introduction
Just Getting from Here to There in Uzbekistan
Historical Connections and Today's Kolkhoz
The Kolkhoz as Plantation
Cuisine, Celebrations and Ceremonies
Running on Empty: Surviving on the Kolkhoz
Uzbekistan's Cotton, Home Economics, and the Larger World
Conclusion
Glossary
References
Index