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IT Architectures and Middleware Strategies for Building Large, Integrated Systems

ISBN-10: 0321246942

ISBN-13: 9780321246943

Edition: 2nd 2004 (Revised)

Authors: Chris Britton, Peter Bye

List price: $59.99
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Description:

This book will help IT architects and managers to navigate the choppy waters of IT architecture and middleware, with a focus on objective, practical information that will guide them in developing optimal architectures that blend both new and more mature technologies. When web services entered center stage, it became a fundamental driver for more "loosely-coupled" architectures. Similarly, the arrival of agile methods also challenged familiar processes. Vendor marketers make it sound easy; but IT professionals will need this thorough, practical book source, to successfully use web services to create loosely-coupled applications, just as they must retain already existing critical processes in the quest to become agile.
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Book details

List price: $59.99
Edition: 2nd
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: Addison Wesley Professional
Publication date: 5/24/2004
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 368
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.034
Language: English

List of Figures
List of Boxes
Preface
Acknowledgments
The Nature of the Problem
Example: Moving to e-business
What is IT architecture?
Why is it different from what we did before?
The IT architecture approach
Alternatives
Why not surround?
Packages
How do we get there?
Rewrite
Evolution
Bringing the techies and modelers together
Conclusions
A Short History of Middleware Technology--From the Stone Age to Message Queuing
Early days
Preliminaries
Remote procedure calls (RPC)
Remote database access
Distributed transaction processing
Message queuing
Message queuing vs. distributed transaction processing
What happened to all this technology?
A Short History of Middleware Technology--Object Middleware
Object-oriented concepts
Object middleware concepts
Object middleware technologies--DCOM and CORBA
Using object interfaces
Conclusions
A Short History of Middleware Technology--Components and the Web
Internet applications
Transactional component middleware
COM+
EJB
The issues of state
Conclusions
Middleware Classification and Middleware Architectures
Middleware elements
Networking and interoperability
The programmatic interface
Server control
System administration infrastructure
A technical classification of middleware?
What is communicating?
How they communicate
What is the interface?
Classifying middleware from technological principles
Vendor architectures
Positioning
Strawman for user target architecture
Marketing
Implicit architectures
Conclusions
What Is Middleware For?
Support for business processes
Transactional, real-time
Transactional, deferrable
Information retrieval
Collaboration
The presentation layer
The transaction server layer
The data layer
A generic functional architecture
Mediators
Conclusions
Resiliency
Using backup servers
Detecting failure
Clean-up work in progress
Activating the application
Reprocessing "lost" messages
Dual active
Applying resiliency techniques in practice
System software failure
Planned downtime
Application software failure
Developing a resiliency strategy
Conclusions
Performance and Scalability
The un-slippery slope
Transaction processing
Object interfaces
Transactional component containers
Two-phase commit
Message queuing
Using remote database access for real-time transactions
Conclusions on real time
Batch
Is distribution an alternative?
Load balancing
Business intelligence systems
Ad-hoc database queries
Data replication
Backups and recovery
Design for scalability and performance
Conclusions
Security and Systems Management
Systems management technology
Security technology
Building application security
Circumventing security
Handling internal security violations
Existing applications
Application support for systems management and security
Conclusions
Implementation Design and Components
Some general comments on design
Implementation design
The presentation layer
Mapping business objects to implementation objects
Grouping objects into components
Making reuse work
Completing the implementation design
Conclusions
Implementing Business Processes
What is a process?
Business processes
The alternative view--functional analysis
Information and processes
Processes and computer applications
Business rules
Real time vs. deferrable
Data distribution
Long transactions
Generic business processes
Batch
Business process flexibility
Conclusions
Information Access and Information Accuracy
Information access
Basic process information
Process management
Process improvement
Customer view
Marketing and strategic business analysis
Summary of requirements for information access
Information accuracy
Shared data or controlled duplication
Shared data
Controlled duplication
Hybrid strategy
Creating consistency in existing databases
The technical problem
The data migration problem
The business process problem
The information controller
Conclusions
Change--Integration
Creating a presentation layer
Screen-scraping task
Interface size mismatch
Turning existing applications into transaction servers
Wrapping
Building a middle tier
Business processing change with new interfaces
Changing the middleware between transaction servers
Runtime integration products
Extensible markup language (XML)
Conclusions
Change--Flexibility
Understanding large applications
Airline example
Bank example
Batch
Conclusions
Building an IT Architecture
Integrated applications architecture
Business process design
Managing information
The organizational and project management context
Understanding existing systems
Business process change design
Application functional design
Implementation design
Implementation--coding
Implementation--testing
Deployment
Project management
Breaking down the barriers
The future
Index