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Transforming Enterprise The Economic and Social Implications of Information Technology

ISBN-10: 0262042215

ISBN-13: 9780262042215

Edition: 2004

Authors: William H. Dutton, Andrew W. Wyckoff, Ramon O'Callaghan, Brian Kahin

List price: $17.75
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Description:

Innovators across all sectors of society are using information and communication technology to reshape economic and social activity. Even after the boom -- and despite the bust -- the process of structural change continues across organizational boundaries. Transforming Enterpriseconsiders the implications of this change from a balanced, post-bust perspective. Original essays examine first the impact on the economy as a whole, and, in particular, the effect on productivity; next, the role of information technology in creating and using knowledge -- especially knowledge that leads to innovation; then, new organizational models, as seen in the interlocking and overlapping networks made possible by the Internet. The authors also analyze structural changes in specific sectors, including the effect of information technology on the automotive industry, demand-driven production and flexible value chains in the personal computer industry, and new models of outsourced manufacturing in the electronics industry. The final essays examine the societal implications of the diverse ways that information technologies are used -- across individuals, groups, communities, and nations, considering questions of access and the digital divide.
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Book details

List price: $17.75
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 11/5/2004
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 528
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.50" tall
Weight: 1.826
Language: English

William H. Dutton is Director of the Oxford Internet Institute, Professor of Internet Studies, and Professorial Fellow of Balliol College at the University of Oxford.

Brian Kahin is Senior Fellow at the Computer & Communications Industry Association in Washington, DC. He is also Research Investigator and Adjunct Professor at the University of Michigan School of Information and a special advisor to the Provost's Office. He is a coeditor of Transforming Enterprise (MIT Press, 2004) and many other books.

Preface
Introductory Essays
Technological Innovation in Organizations and Their Ecosystems
Continuity or Transformation? Social and Technical Perspectives on Information and Communication Technologies
Transforming the Economy
Intangible Assets and the Economic Impact of Computers
Projecting Productivity Growth: Lessons from the US Growth Resurgence
The Impacts of ICT on Economic Performance: An International Comparison at Three Levels of Analysis
Knowledge and Innovation
New Models of Innovation and the Role of Information Technologies in the Knowledge Economy
Using Knowledge to Transform Enterprises
Transformation through Cyberinfrastructure-Based Knowledge Environments
Networks and Organizations
Toward a Network Topology of Enterprise Transformation and Innovation
IT-Enabled Growth Nodes in Europe: Concepts, Issues, and Research Agenda
Supernetworks: Paradoxes, Challenges, and New Opportunities
Sector Transformation
Transforming Production in a Digital Era
Automotive Informatics: Information Technology and Enterprise Transformation in the Automobile Industry
The Role of Information Technology in Transforming the Personal Computer Industry
IT and the Changing Social Division of Labor: The Case of Electronics Contract Manufacturing
Community and Society, Home and Place
Public Volunteer Work on the Internet
The Internet and Social Transformation: Reconfiguring Access
Impersonal Sociotechnical Capital, ICTs, and Collective Action among Strangers
The Tech-Enabled Networked Home: An Analysis of Current Trends and Future Promise
The Social Impact of the Internet: A 2003 Update
Charting Digital Divides: Comparing Socioeconomic, Gender, Life Stage, and Rural-Urban Internet Access and Use in Five Countries
Appendix
Contributors
Index