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Memories Are Made of This How Memory Works in Humans and Animals

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ISBN-10: 0231120214

ISBN-13: 9780231120210

Edition: N/A

Authors: Rusiko Bourtchouladze

List price: $32.00
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Description:

Memory enables us to make experience meaningful and to form coherent identities for ourselves and intelligible perceptions of others. Indeed, our ability to imagine, anticipate, and create the future is directly commensurate with our ability to retrieve and recollect past experiences. But for all its vital importance in human cognition, for all that it seems so ordinary and obvious, memory remains in many ways as complex and mysterious today as it seemed to ancient philosophers. We need only to think about the "tip-of-the-tongue" experience to wonder how memories are formed, where they reside in our brains, and why some are retained, while others are forgotten. What is the difference…    
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Book details

List price: $32.00
Publisher: Columbia University Press
Publication date: 2/18/2004
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 208
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.682
Language: English

Rusiko Bourtchouladze, a director of model systems at Helicon Therapeutics, Inc., and an adjunct associate professor at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, has published many key articles and papers on memory research.

Translator's Introduction Author's Introduction to the English Edition The Emergence of the Issue
The Course and Conditions of the Establishment of the Military Comfort Station System: From the First Shanghai Incident to the Start of All-Out War in China
Expansion Into Southeast Asia and the Pacific: The Period of the Asia Pacific War
How Were the Women Rounded Up? Comfort Women's Testimonies and Soldiers' Recollections
The Lives Comfort Women Were Forced to Lead
Violations of International Law and War Crime Trials
Conditions After the Defeat
Conclusion
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography
Index