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Seducer's Diary

ISBN-10: 014103484X

ISBN-13: 9780141034843

Edition: N/A

Authors: S�ren Kierkegaard, Victor Eremita, Alastair Hannay, Soren Kierkegaard

List price: $10.00
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Description:

Love can be surprising. Love can be heartbreaking. Love can be an art. But love is the singular emotion that all humans rely on most . . . and crave endlessly, no matter what the cost. United by this theme of love, the nine titles in the Penguin Great Loves collectioninclude tales of blissful and all-encompassing, doomed and tragic, erotic and absurd, seductive and adulterous, innocent and murderous love. A deeply moving addition to the Penguin Great Ideas and Great Journeys series, each gorgeously packaged book will challenge all expectations of love while celebrating the beauty of its existence. All books in this series:Cures for Love Doomed Love The Eaten Heart First Love Forbidden Fruit The Kreutzer Sonata A Mere Interlude Of Mistresses, Tigresses and Other Conquests The Seducers Diary
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Book details

List price: $10.00
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/18/2007
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 144
Size: 4.25" wide x 7.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.220
Language: English

Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, S�ren Kierkegaard was the son of a wealthy middle-class merchant. He lived all his life on his inheritance, using it to finance his literary career. He studied theology at the University of Copenhagen, completing a master's thesis in 1841 on the topic of irony in Socrates. At about this time, he became engaged to a woman he loved, but he broke the engagement when he decided that God had destined him not to marry. The years 1841 to 1846 were a period of intense literary activity for Kierkegaard, in which he produced his "authorship," a series of writings of varying forms published under a series of fantastic pseudonyms. Parallel to these, he wrote a series of shorter Edifying Discourses, quasi-sermons published under his own name. As he later interpreted it in the posthumously published Point of View for My Work as an Author, the authorship was a systematic attempt to raise the question of what it means to be a Christian. Kierkegaard was persuaded that in his time people took the meaning of the Christian life for granted, allowing all kinds of worldly and pagan ways of thinking and living to pass for Christian. He applied this analysis especially to the speculative philosophy of German idealism. After 1846, Kierkegaard continued to write, publishing most works under his own name. Within Denmark he was isolated and often despised, a man whose writings had little impact in his own day or for a long time afterward. They were translated into German early in the twentieth century and have had an enormous influence since then, on both Christian theology and the existentialist tradition in philosophy.