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Introduction to Philosophical Analysis

ISBN-10: 0132663058

ISBN-13: 9780132663052

Edition: 4th 1997

Authors: John Hospers

List price: $135.20
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Description:

Appropriate for introductory courses in Philosophy. This text provides an in-depth, problem-oriented introduction to philosophical analysis using an extremely clear, readable approach. The Fourth Edition only updates coverage throughout the book, but also restores the introductory chapterWords and the Worldthe most distinguished, widely acclaimed feature of the first two editions.
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Book details

List price: $135.20
Edition: 4th
Copyright year: 1997
Publisher: Prentice Hall PTR
Publication date: 12/4/1996
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 288
Size: 7.00" wide x 10.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.298
Language: English

Words and the World: Language and Reality
Philosophical Questions
Words and Things
Definition
Vagueness
Connotation
Ostensive Definition
Meaninglessness
What Can We Know? Knowledge
What is Knowing?
The Sources of Knowledge
Exercises
What Is the World Like? Perceiving the World
Common-Sense Realism
Berkeley's Idealism
The Attack on Foundations
Exercises
The Way the World Works: Scientific Knowledge
Laws of Nature
Explanation
Theories
Possibility
The Problem of Induction
Exercises
What Is and What Must Be: Freedom and Necessity
Mathematics
Kant and the Synthetic Apriori
Causality
Determinism and Freedom
Exercises
What Am I? Mind and Body
The Physical and the Mental
The Relation Between the Physical and the Mental
Personal Identity
Exercises
What Else Is There? Philosophy of Religion
Religious Experience
The Ongological Argument
The Cosmological Argument
The Argument from Miracles
The Teleological Argument (The Argument from Design)
Anthropomorphism and Mysticism
Exercises
The Is and the Ought: Problems in Ethics
Meta-ethics
The Good
Theories of Conduct
Exercises