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Acting Together Performance and the Creative Transformation of Conflict - Resistance and Reconciliation in Regions of Violence

ISBN-10: 0981559395

ISBN-13: 9780981559391

Edition: 2011

Authors: Cynthia E. Cohen, Roberto Guti�rrez Varea, Polly O. Walker, Charles Mulekwa, Dijana Milosevic

List price: $32.50
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Book details

List price: $32.50
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: New Village Press
Publication date: 8/19/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 310
Size: 7.25" wide x 9.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.650

Cynthia E. Cohen is director of the program in Peacebuilding and the Arts at the International Center for Ethics, Justice and Public Life at Brandeis University. In that role, she leads research and action partnerships, teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and leads professional development workshops and institutes for practitioners. She is principal investigator in an on-going inquiry into Creative Approaches to Coexistence and Reconciliation and writes on the ethical and aesthetic dimensions of reconciliation. Since 2005, Cohen has worked in collaboration with Theatre Without Borders on Acting Together on the World Stage, a project that is culminating in an anthology, documentary, website and toolkit for practitioners. Cohen was the founding director of the Oral History Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has facilitated coexistence efforts involving participants from the Middle East, the US, Central America, and Sri Lanka. She holds a PhD in education from the University of New Hampshire, a MA in city planning from MIT, and a BA degree in ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University.

Cynthia Cohen is director of the program in Peacebuilding and the Arts at the International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life at Brandeis University. In that role, she leads research and action partnerships, teaches at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and leads professional development workshops and institutes for practitioners. She is principal investigator in an on-going inquiry into Creative Approaches to Coexistence and Reconciliation and writes on the ethical and aesthetic dimensions of reconciliation. Since 2005, Cohen has worked in collaboration with Theatre Without Borders on Acting Together on the World Stage, a project that is culminating in an anthology, documentary, website and toolkit for practitioners. Cohen was the founding director of the Oral History Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has facilitated coexistence efforts involving participants from the Middle East, the U.S., Central America, and Sri Lanka. She holds a PhD in Education from theUniversity of New Hampshire, a Master in City Planning from MIT, and a BA degree in Ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University. Roberto Gutiérrez Varea began his career in theater in his native Argentina. His research and creative work focuses on live performance as means of resistance and peacebuilding, in the context of social conflict and state violence. Varea's stage work in the United States has focused on Latin@/Chican@ theatre, directing world or west-coast premieres of works by Migdalia Cruz, Ariel Dorfman, Cherrie Moraga, and Jose Rivera (among others). He is the founding artistic director of community-based performance groups Soapstone Theatre Company, and El Teatro Jornalero!, and co-founder of the San Francisco-based collective Secos & Mojados. He is an associate editor of Peace Review (Routledge) and guest-edited the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics' e-misférica. Varea is a founding faculty of the Performing Arts and Social Justice Program, and director of the Center for Latino Studies in the Americas (CELASA), at the University of San Francisco. Polly O. Walker is a postdoctoral research fellow with the Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of Queensland. She is principal investigator of a research project examining the role of memorial ceremonies in transforming conflict between Indigenous and Settler peoples in Australia and the United States. She is also collaborating with the Malvatumauri Council of Chiefs in Vanuatu on transformative justice processes related to illegal aspects of the labour trade in Queensland. Prior to this, Walker held the position of lecturer in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Unit at the University of Queensland, where her research focused on reconciliation and on the reduction of epistemic violence toward Indigenous peoples and their knowledge systems. Walker is of Cherokee and Settler descent and grew up in the traditional country of the Mescalero Apache. She holds a doctorate from the University of Queensland Brisbane, Australia, and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Mexico.

Polly O. Walker is assistant professor of peace and conflict studies at Juniata College in Huntingdon, Pennsylvania. She is director of Partners in Peacebuilding, a private consulting organization based in Brisbane, Australia, and lectures widely on intercultural conflict resolution. Previously awarded the University of Queensland Postdoctoral Research Fellowship for Women, she conducted research on the role of memorial ceremonies in transforming conflict involving Indigenous and Settler peoples in the United States and Australia. She has been a contributing author in three books: Mediating Across Difference: Indigenous, Oceanic and Asian Approaches to Conflict Resolution (2010), Transforming Mediation in the Asia-Pacific Region: Building Peace (2009), and Fundamentals of Organizational Behavior: Key Concepts, Skills and Best Practices (2007). She has also published articles in a broad range of international journals, and contributed chapters to several texts on conflict transformation. She is vice-chair of the Indigenous Education Institute, a research and practice institute created for the preservation and contemporary application of Indigenous traditional knowledge. Walker is of Cherokee and Settler descent and grew up in the traditional country of the Mescalero Apache.

Charles Mulekwa is an award-winning playwright, performer, composer, and producer. He began writing plays in his native Uganda and his interests center on the ways in which war within Uganda has informed Ugandan theatre. He has produced such works as The Woman in Me, The Eleventh Commandment, and A Time of Fire . He was in the National Theatre of Uganda for many years, and served as a cultural consultant for the award-winning film The Last King of Scotland . Mulekwa is currently completing his PhD in performance studies at Brown University.

Foreword: Acting Together on the World Stage
Preface: Lights in the Darkness
Acknowledgments
Contributors
Introduction: Setting the Stage
Singing in the Dark Times: Peacebuilding Performance in the Midst of Direct Violence
Introduction to Section I
Theatre as a Way of Creating Sense: Performance and Peacebuilding in the Region of the Former Yugoslavia
Theatre, War, and Peace in Uganda
The Created Space: Peacebuilding and Performance in Sri Lanka
Theatre, Resistance, and Peacebuilding in Palestine
Weaving Dialogues and Confronting Harsh Realities: Engendering Social Change in Israel through Performance
Holding Fast to the Feet of the Rising Condor: Peacebuilding Performance in the Aftermath of Mass Violence
Introduction to Section II
Fire in the Memory: Theatre, Truth, and Justice in Argentina and Peru
Hidden Fires: PeaceWorks' Invocations as Zizekian Response to the Gujarat Massacres of 2002
Alive on Stage in Cambodia: Time, Histories, and Bodies
Creating a New Story: Ritual, Ceremony, and Conflict Transformation between Indigenous and Settler Peoples
Afterword
Presentation of Volume II
Notes
Bibliography
Credits
Index