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Summary of Philosophy

ISBN-10: 0872206572

ISBN-13: 9780872206571

Edition: 2003

Authors: Thomas Aquinas, Richard J. Regan, Richard J. Regan

List price: $16.00
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Description:

This compact collection of philosophical texts from the Summa Theologica -- on God, creation, the soul, human acts, moral good and evil, love, habits, virtue, and law -- is presented newly translated in abridged form and cast in a modified version of the medieval quaestio. Included are only the most important objections and Aquinas' replies; appeals to scriptural, theological, and philosophical authorities have been omitted. Unlike the ordering of the originals, questions and answers are here presented prior to objections and replies; the result is a sharp, rich, topically organised question-answer presentation of Aquinas' major philosophical arguments within a brief compass. A general Introduction, head notes, a glossary, an index, and a select bibliography offer expert guidance to the work of this major philosopher.
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Book details

List price: $16.00
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date: 3/15/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 256
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.25" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.880
Language: English

Thomas Aquinas, the most noted philosopher of the Middle Ages, was born near Naples, Italy, to the Count of Aquino and Theodora of Naples. As a young man he determined, in spite of family opposition to enter the new Order of Saint Dominic. He did so in 1244. Thomas Aquinas was a fairly radical Aristotelian. He rejected any form of special illumination from God in ordinary intellectual knowledge. He stated that the soul is the form of the body, the body having no form independent of that provided by the soul itself. He held that the intellect was sufficient to abstract the form of a natural object from its sensory representations and thus the intellect was sufficient in itself for natural knowledge without God's special illumination. He rejected the Averroist notion that natural reason might lead individuals correctly to conclusions that would turn out false when one takes revealed doctrine into account. Aquinas wrote more than sixty important works. The Summa Theologica is considered his greatest work. It is the doctrinal foundation for all teachings of the Roman Catholic Church.

Preface
Biblical Abbreviations
Other Abbreviations
Introduction
God
Existence
Simplicity
Perfection
Goodness
Infinity
Immutability
Eternity
Only One
Our Knowledge of God
Our Predicates about God
Knowledge
Ideas
Life
Will
Love
Justice and Mercy
Providence
Predestination
Power
Creation and Governance
God the First Cause
Manner
Beginning
Diversity
Evil
Governance
The Soul
Essence
Union with the Body
Vegetative Powers
Cognitive Sense Powers
Sense Appetites
Cognitive Intellectual Powers
How the Soul Understands Material Things
Manner and Process of Understanding
What the Intellect Knows about Material Things
How the Soul Knows Itself, Its Innate Dispositions, and Its Acts
How the Soul Knows Superior Things
Appetitive Intellectual Power, the Will
Production
The Ultimate Human End: Happiness
Human Acts
The Voluntary and the Involuntary
The Will
Intention
Choice
Deliberation
Consent
Acts Commanded by the Will
Moral Goodness and Malice
Human Acts in General
Interior Acts of the Will
External Human Acts
Emotions
Love
Kinds
Causes
Effects
Habits
In General
Subjects in Which Habits Inhere
Causes
Virtue
Essence
Intellectual Virtues
Moral Virtues
Relation of Moral Virtue to Intellectual Virtue
Law
Essence
Kinds
Effects
The Eternal Law
The Natural Law
Human Laws
The Moral Precepts of the Old Law
Precepts of the Old Law Regarding Rulers
Glossary
Select Bibliography
Index