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Works and Days and Theogony

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ISBN-10: 0872201791

ISBN-13: 9780872201798

Edition: 1993

Authors: Hesiod, Stanley Lombardo, Robert Lamberton

List price: $12.00
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Description:

"This is by far the best rendering of Hesiod's poems in print. The translation is fully accurate but so readable one doesn't want to stop; it exactly captures Hesiod's rustic wisdom, his humour and his cautious pessimism. . . . Clear brief notes and a glossary make this a must for introductory courses: students will love it." -- Richard Janko, University College, London
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Book details

List price: $12.00
Copyright year: 1993
Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date: 10/1/1993
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 160
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.462
Language: English

The poet Hesiod tells us that his father gave up sea-trading and moved from Ascra to Boeotia, that as he himself tended sheep on Mount Helicon the Muses commanded him to sing of the gods, and that he won a tripod for a funeral song at Chalcis. The poems credited to him with certainty are: the Theogony, an attempt to bring order into the otherwise chaotic material of Greek mythology through genealogies and anecdotes about the gods; and The Works and Days, a wise sermon addressed to his brother Perses as a result of a dispute over their dead father's estate. This latter work presents the injustice of the world with mythological examples and memorable images, and concludes with a collection of folk wisdom. Uncertain attributions are the Shield of Heracles and the Catalogue of Women. Hesiod is a didactic and individualistic poet who is often compared and contrasted with Homer, as both are representative of early epic style. "Hesiod is earth-bound and dun colored; indeed part of his purpose is to discredit the brilliance and the ideals of heroism glorified in the homeric tradition. But Hesiod, too, is poetry, though of a different order. . . " (Moses Hadas, N.Y. Times).

Stanley Lombardo is Professor of Classics, University of Kansas.