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Nature and Walking

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ISBN-10: 0807014192

ISBN-13: 9780807014196

Edition: 1994

Authors: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry Thoreau, John C. Elder

List price: $15.00
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Description:

Together in one volume, Emerson's Nature and Thoreau's Walking, is writing that defines our distinctly American relationship to nature. "Certain writings should be read together, and these two make perfect partners. A beautiful new volume." -Walking
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Book details

List price: $15.00
Copyright year: 1994
Publisher: Beacon Press
Publication date: 7/1/1994
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 144
Size: 5.00" wide x 8.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.572
Language: English

Known primarily as the leader of the philosophical movement transcendentalism, which stresses the ties of humans to nature, Ralph Waldo Emerson, American poet and essayist, was born in Boston in 1803. From a long line of religious leaders, Emerson became the minister of the Second Church (Unitarian) in 1829. He left the church in 1832 because of profound differences in interpretation and doubts about church doctrine. He visited England and met with British writers and philosophers. It was during this first excursion abroad that Emerson formulated his ideas for Self-Reliance. He returned to the United States in 1833 and settled in Concord, Massachusetts. He began lecturing in Boston. His…    

In September 1842, Nathaniel Hawthorne noted this social encounter in his journal: "Mr. Thorow dined with us yesterday. He is a singular character---a young man with much of wild original nature still remaining in him; and so far as he is sophisticated, it is in a way and method of his own. He is as ugly as sin, long-nosed, queer-mouthed, and with uncouth and somewhat rustic, although courteous manners, corresponding very well with such an exterior. But his ugliness is of an honest and agreeable fashion, and becomes him much better than beauty. On the whole, I find him a healthy and wholesome man to know." Most responses to Thoreau are as ambiguously respectful as was Hawthorne's. Thoreau…