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Marketing Dictatorship

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ISBN-10: 0742540588

ISBN-13: 9780742540583

Edition: N/A

Authors: Anne-Mari Brady

List price: $46.00
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Description:

After a period of self-imposed exclusion, Chinese society is in the process of a massive transformation in the name of economic progress and integration into the world economy, yet the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is seeking to maintain its rule over China indefinitely. Examining Chinese propaganda and thought work in the current period offers readers a unique understanding of how the CCP will address real and perceived threats to stability and its continued hold on power.
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Book details

List price: $46.00
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date: 11/16/2009
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 246
Size: 6.00" wide x 8.75" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

Figures
Abbreviations
Preface
Introduction
Guiding Hand: The Role of the Propaganda System
The Structure of the Propaganda System
Types of Propaganda
The Central Propaganda Department
The Powers of the Central Propaganda Department
Channels for "Guidance"
The Structure of the Central Propaganda Department
Staffing Issues
The Leadership of the Propaganda System
Office for Foreign Propaganda/State Council Information Office
Provincial and Local Level Propaganda Departments
Some Other Organizations within the Propaganda System
Conclusion
from Thought Reform to Economic Reform: Comparing Propaganda and Thought Work in Different Eras
Constructing Socialist China: Propaganda and Thought Work, 1949-1965
A Revolution from Within: Propaganda and Thought Work in the Cultural Revolution, 1966-1976
The Path to 1989: Propaganda and Thought Work in the Post-Mao Era
1989: Turning Point of a New Era
Rebuilding Legitimacy in a One-Party State: Propaganda and Thought Work in the Post-'89 Era
1989-1992: Seizing with Both Hands
1992-1994: Modernizing and Rationalizing the Propaganda System
1995-1998: Taiwan Crisis, China Threat
1999-2002: The Enemy Within, and the Enemy Without
2002-2004: Power Struggle-Jiang the "Hardliner" versus Hu the "Reformer"
2004-2007: Hu the "Conservative"
Conclusion
China's Unseen Engineers: Reform and Modernization in the Propaganda System
The Origins of Modern Propaganda/PR Work
Out with the Old, in with the New: Rejecting the Goals, but Not All the Methods, of Mao-Era Propaganda Methodology
New Ways of Looking at Propaganda Work in China
Adapting Western Social Science Theories to Chinese Needs
Modernizing Traditional Propaganda Methods
Political PR
Both Mouthpiece and Watchdog: The Chinese Media's Revised Role
Public Advertising
24-hour Spin Doctors
Conclusion
Regimenting the Public Mind: The Methods of Control in the Propaganda System
Propaganda Departments' Role in Censorship
Restricting the Information Flow: Propaganda Guidelines as a Form of Control
State Organizations with a Censorship Role
Regulations as a Means of Control104
Rule by Law
The Market as a Means and a Justification for Control
Appointing Gatekeepers as a Means of Control
The Carrot Approach: Rewards as a Means of Control
Spiritual Civilization: Setting Social Norms as a Means of Control
Controlling Social Science
Conclusion
Sex Crime, Wheels of Law, and Song Zuying: Managing Information Communication Technology in China
Pinning Jell-O to the Wall: How China Manages the Internet
The Use of Laws and Regulations to Control the Internet
Using Architecture to Control the Internet
Little Brother and Little Sister Are Watching You: Norms as a Means to Control the Internet
Sex Crime, Wheels of Law, and Song Zuying: How China Uses the Market to Control the Internet
The Internet as a New Locus for China's Propaganda and Thought Work
Cyber War: Aggressive Use of the Internet by Government Agents
The Internet as a Control Mechanism in China
The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: China's Move to Infotainment
Telecommunications as a Propaganda Tool
Radio's Role in Propaganda
Conclusion
Combating Hostile Forces: China's Foreign Propaganda Work since 1989
Foreign Propaganda in the 1980s
Enemies All Over the World
The Post-1989 Foreign Propaganda Administrative System
Foreign Propaganda Themes Post-1989
China's Foreign Propagandists
China's Foreign Propaganda Media
Political PR, Public Diplomacy, and Spin Doctors
Conclusion
Models and Anti-Models: Searching for a New, New China
Anti-Model: Gorbachev's Glasnost Policy and its Outcome
Both Models and Anti-Models: Propaganda and Thought Work in the Communist/Post-Communist World since 1989
The West as a Model for China
Goodbye to All That?
China's New Model: A New, New China
Toward a New Paradigm of CCP Rule
Rating the Effectiveness of China's Modernized Propaganda System
Conclusion
The Rebirth of the Propaganda State
Glossary
Selected Bibliography
Index
About the Author