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Public Choice III

ISBN-10: 0521894751

ISBN-13: 9780521894753

Edition: 3rd 2002 (Revised)

Authors: Dennis C. Mueller

List price: $60.99
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Description:

This book represents a considerable revision and expansion of 'Public Choice II' (1989). Six new chapters have been added, and several chapters from the previous edition have been greatly revised.
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Book details

List price: $60.99
Edition: 3rd
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 2/17/2003
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 790
Size: 7.00" wide x 10.00" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 2.948
Language: English

Dennis C. Mueller is Professor of Economics at the University of Vienna.

Introduction
Origins of the State
The reason for collective choice - allocative efficiency
The reason for collective choice - redistribution
Public Choice in a Direct Democracy
The choice of voting rule
Majority rule - positive properties
Majority rule - normative properties
Simple alternatives to majority rule
Complicated alternatives to majority rule
Exit, voice and disloyalty
Public Choice in a Representative Democracy
Federalism
Two-party competition - deterministic voting
Two-party competition - probabilistic voting
Multiparty systems
The paradox of voting
Rent seeking
Bureaucracy
Legislatures and bureaucracies
Dictatorship
Applications and Testing
Political competition and macroeconomic performance
Interest groups, campaign contributions and lobbying
The size of government
Government size and economic performance
Normative public choice
Social welfare functions
The impossibility of a social ordering
A just social contract
The constitution as a utilitarian contract
Liberal rights and social choices
What Have We Learned?
Has public choice contributed anything to the study of politics?
Allocation, redistribution, and public choice