Skip to content

Helen

Spend $50 to get a free DVD!

ISBN-10: 0521545412

ISBN-13: 9780521545419

Edition: 2008

Authors: Euripides, William Allan, Euripides

List price: $44.99
Shipping box This item qualifies for FREE shipping.
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

This up-to-date edition offers a detailed literary and cultural analysis of Euripides' Helen, a work which arguably embodies the variety and dynamism of fifth-century Athenian tragedy more than any other surviving play. The story of an exemplary wife (not an adulteress) who went to Egypt (not to Troy), Euripides' 'new Helen' skilfully transforms and supplants earlier currents of literature and myth. The Introduction elucidates Euripides' treatment of Helen and sets the play in its wider intellectual context. It also discusses questions of genre and reception, rejecting such descriptions as 'tragicomedy' or 'romantic tragedy', and showing how later artists have responded to Euripides'…    
Customers also bought

Book details

List price: $44.99
Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 2/11/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 386
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.25" long x 0.95" tall
Weight: 1.188
Language: English

Euripides, one of the three great Greek tragedians was born in Attica probably in 485 B.C. of well-to-do parents. In his youth he cultivated gymnastic pursuits and studied philosophy and rhetoric. Soon after he received recognition for a play that he had written, Euripides left Athens for the court of Archelaus, king of Macedonia. In his tragedies, Euripides represented individuals not as they ought to be but as they are. His excellence lies in the tenderness and pathos with which he invested many of his characters. Euripides' attitude toward the gods was iconoclastic and rationalistic; toward humans-notably his passionate female characters-his attitude was deeply sympathetic. In his…    

Introduction
Euripides and Athens
The figure of Helen in early Greek culture
Helen on stage
The 'New Helen'
The production
A tragedy of ideas
Genre
Helen transformed
The text and its transmission
Helen
Commentary