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Inferno

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ISBN-10: 0486442888

ISBN-13: 9780486442884

Edition: 2005

Authors: Dante Alighieri, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

List price: $6.00
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Description:

The first of the three canticles in "La divina commedia (The Divine Comedy), this fourteenth-century allegorical poem begins Dante's imaginary journey from Hell to Purgatory to Paradise with his sojourn among the damned. His encounters with historical and mythological creatures--each symbolic of a particular vice or crime--blend vivid and shocking imagery with graceful lyricism in a monumental work of world literature. This acclaimed and accessible translation was rendered by the beloved nineteenth-century poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
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Book details

List price: $6.00
Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Dover Publications, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/1/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 256
Size: 5.31" wide x 8.27" long x 0.67" tall
Weight: 0.660
Language: English

Born Dante Alighieri in the spring of 1265 in Florence, Italy, he was known familiarly as Dante. His family was noble, but not wealthy, and Dante received the education accorded to gentlemen, studying poetry, philosophy, and theology. His first major work was Il Vita Nuova, The New Life. This brief collection of 31 poems, held together by a narrative sequence, celebrates the virtue and honor of Beatrice, Dante's ideal of beauty and purity. Beatrice was modeled after Bice di Folco Portinari, a beautiful woman Dante had met when he was nine years old and had worshipped from afar in spite of his own arranged marriage to Gemma Donati. Il Vita Nuova has a secure place in literary history: its…    

During his lifetime, Longfellow enjoyed a popularity that few poets have ever known. This has made a purely literary assessment of his achievement difficult, since his verse has had an effect on so many levels of American culture and society. Certainly, some of his most popular poems are, when considered merely as artistic compositions, found wanting in serious ways: the confused imagery and sentimentality of "A Psalm of Life" (1839), the excessive didacticism of "Excelsior" (1841), the sentimentality of "The Village Blacksmith" (1839). Yet, when judged in terms of popular culture, these works are probably no worse and, in some respects, much better than their counterparts in our time.…