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Wildlife Forensics Methods and Applications

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ISBN-10: 047066259X

ISBN-13: 9780470662595

Edition: 2012

Authors: Jane E. Huffman, John R. Wallace

List price: $57.95
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Description:

Wildlife Forensics: Methods and Applications provides an accessible and practical approach to the key areas involved in this developing subject. The book contains numerous global case studies throughout that take the reader from the field, to the lab analysis to the court room, giving a complete insight into the path of forensic evidence and demonstrating how current techniques can be applied to wildlife forensics.  The text covers a number of different areas in forensics, entomology, hair identification, use of DNA for individualization and species identification. The book also includes reference material pertaining to the field of wildlife forensics and demonstrates how other areas of…    
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Book details

List price: $57.95
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Limited
Publication date: 12/23/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 400
Size: 6.65" wide x 9.65" long x 0.80" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

Developments in Forensic Science
About the Editors
List of Contributors
Foreword
Acknowledgements
Wildlife Ownership
Introduction
Ancient Rome and the Concept of Res Nullius
Common Law England: The King's Ownership
The New World: Hunting for the Market
Management: The Property Right of States
Federal Law and the Regulatory State
Globalization: Working toward Worldwide Conservation Practices
Conclusion
Cases Cited
References
Society for Wildlife Forensic Science
Introduction
Formation of the Society
The Code of Ethics
Membership of the Society
Member Labs
Proficiency Program
Scientific Working Group for Wildlife Forensic Sciences (SWGWILD)
Conclusion
References
The Application of Forensic Science to WUdlife Evidence
Introduction
Overview of Forensic Science
History of Wildlife Forensics
Enforcement of Wildlife Protection Policy
Development of Wildlife Forensic Laboratories
Current Perceptions
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Denning a Crime Scene and Physical Evidence Collection
Introduction
Definition of a Crime Scene
Questions to Be Asked
Scene Priority
First Responding Officer
Securing the Scene
Chain of Custody
Processing the Scene
Initial Documentation
Scene Documentation
Remains in an Aquatic Environment
Collection of Evidence
Review of Scene Processing
Final Inspection
References
Forensic Evidence Collection and Cultural Motives for Animal Harvesting
Introduction
Wild Animals as Pharmacopeias
Trade in Wild Animals
Recovering Evidence at Poaching Scenes
Locating the Burial: Anomalies on the Surface
Acknowledgements
References
Forensic Entomology and Wildlife
Introduction
Application of Forensic Entomology to Wildlife Crimes
Arthropods Commonly Encountered
Diptera
Coleoptera
Sampling
Conclusion
Appendix
Acknowledgements
References
Wildlife Forensic Pathology and Toxicology in Wound Analysis and Pesticide Poisoning
Introduction
Wound Analysis
Wildlife Poisoning by Insecticides
Wildlife Poisoning by Rodenticides
References
The Use of Hair Morphology in the Identification of Mammals
Introduction
Types of Hair
Hair Structure
Techniques for Studying Hair Structure
Conclusion
References
Plants and Wildlife Forensics
Introduction
Plants as Trace Evidence
Poisonous Plants
The Basics of Collecting and Preserving Botanical Evidence
Finding a Forensic Botanist
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Identification of Reptile Skin Products Using Scale Morphology
Introduction
International Trade in Reptile Skins
Challenges to Species Identification of Reptile Skin Products
Species and Products Represented in the Reptile Skin Trade
Reptile Scale Morphology Basics and Current Limitations
Identifying Features of Major Reptile Groups
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
Best Practices in Wildlife Forensic DNA
Introduction
The Need for Appropriate Standards
Wildlife Forensic DNA Best Practices
Standards and Guidelines for Wildlife Forensics
Training
Case File
Laboratory Facility (QA)
Validation
Laboratory Protocols
Data Analysis
Interpretation Guidelines
Vouchers/Reference Samples
Species Identification
Reporting
Contents of the Case Report
Review
Court Testimony
The Way Forward
Note
Acknowledgements
References
Statistics for Wildlife Forensic DNA
Introduction
The Central Problem
Genetic Sampling
Lineage Markers
Relatedness
Inbreeding
Testing for Allele Independence
Assignment testing
Conclusion
References
Forensic DNA Analysis of Wildlife Evidence
Introduction
DNA Isolation and Handling
Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)
Sample Speciation
Minisatellites (VNTRs)
Mitochondrial Markers (mtDNA)
Additional Genetic Speciation Methods
Limitations of Genetic Speciation
Sample Sexing
Sample Individualization
Sample Localization
Validation of Wildlife Forensic Techniques
Court Admissibility
Conclusion
Cases Cited
References
DNA Applications and Implementation
Introduction
History
Questions and Techniques: Wildlife Crime Issues
Species Identification
Identification of Geographic Origin
Individual Identification
Exclusion
Practical Applications
Sample Types for DNA Analysis
Laboratory Models: Individual Facilities
Future Developments
Summary
References
Conservation Genetics and Wildlife Forensics of Birds
Introduction
Avian Genetics
Avian Taxonomy, Legislation and Conservation
Avian Wildlife Forensics: A Range of Applications
Conservation Genetics and Wildlife Forensics: Identification Using DNA
Conclusion
References
Wildlife Forensics in Thailand: Utilization of Mitochondrial DNA Sequences
Introduction
DNA Extraction and Amplification
DNA Sequencing
Origin Identification
Species and Subspecies Identification
Results of the Investigations
Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
The Future of Wildlife Forensic Science
Introduction
Technical Challenges
Enhancing Wildlife Protection by Integrating Forensic Science and the Law
The U.S. Endangered Species Act and the Limits of Science
The Future of Forensic Scientists and the Laboratories in which They Work
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
Index