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One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

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ISBN-10: 0451228146

ISBN-13: 9780451228147

Edition: N/A

Authors: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Yevgeny Yevtushenko, Eric Bogosian

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Description:

The first published novel of controversial Nobel Prize winning author Alexander Solzhenitsyn— now in trade paperback. First published in 1962, this book is considered one of the most significant works ever to emerge from Soviet Russia. Illuminating a dark chapter in Russian history, it is at once a graphic picture of work camp life and a moving tribute to man’s will to prevail over relentless dehumanization, told by “a literary genius whose talent matches that of Dostoyevsky, Turgenev, Tolstoy, [and] Gorky” (Harrison Salisbury, New York Times).
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Book details

List price: $14.00
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 8/4/2009
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 208
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.396
Language: English

Author and historian Aleksandr Isayevick Solzhenitsyn, considered by many to be the preeminent Russian writer of the second half of the 20th century, was born on December 11, 1918 in Kislovodsk in the northern Caucusus Mountains. In 1941, he graduated from Rostov University with a degree in physics and math. He also took correspondence courses at Moscow State University. Solzhenitsyn served in the Russian army during World War II but was arrested in 1945 for writing a letter criticizing Stalin. He spent the next decade in prisons and labor camps and, later, exile, before being allowed to return to central Russia, where he taught and wrote. In 1970, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. In 1974, he was arrested for treason and exiled following the publication of The Gulag Archipelago. He moved to Switzerland and later the U. S. where he continued to write fiction and history. When the Soviet Union collapsed, he returned to his homeland. He died due to a heart ailment on August 3, 2008.

Yevtushenko was born in a small junction on the Trans-Siberian Railroad (the subject of his 1956 long poem Zima Junction). After Stalin's death in 1953, he emerged as an important poet and spokesman for the younger generation. In 1961 Yevtushenko published "Babi Yar," which deals with the notorious wartime massacre of Jews in a ravine near Kiev. The poem made Yevtushenko internationally famous, and because it raised the spectre of domestic anti-Semitism, aroused a storm of official opposition. He also created a furor with "Stalin's Heirs" (1962), which raised the spectre of resurgent Stalinism. Over the years, however, Yevtushenko became part of the Soviet establishment. He seriously damaged his early reputation as a defender of artistic freedom by easily yielding to coercion to write works following the official line. Yet at times he took quite liberal positions at odds with the powers that be. In the Gorbachev period, he became active in political life and has continued to advocate reform, fighting for change within the Writers' Union. Like Voznesensky, Yevtushenko traveled extensively abroad. His trips inspired many topical, sometimes autobiographical works well received by Western as well as Russian readers: Though exuberant in his verbal style, the poet is quite accessible. But overall, although sometimes quite effective, his writing lacks true depth.

Eric Bogosian is the author of the plays "Talk Radio," "subUrbia." & "Griller," & the Obie Award-winning solo performances "Drinking in America," "Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead," & "Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll." He is the recipient of the Berlin Film Festival Silver Bear Award, a Drama Desk Award, & two NEA fellowships. An actor who has appeared in more than a dozen feature films & television shows, Bogosian lives in New York City.