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Story of Ferdinand

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ISBN-10: 044845694X

ISBN-13: 9780448456942

Edition: 2011

Authors: Munro Leaf, Robert Lawson

List price: $4.99
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Description:

Ferdinand is the world's most peaceful--and--beloved little bull. While all of the other bulls snort, leap, and butt their heads, Ferdinand is content to just sit and smell the flowers under his favorite cork tree. Leaf's simple storytelling paired with Lawson's pen-and-ink drawings make The Story of Ferdinanda true classic. Commemorate the 75th anniversary of the book's original publication with this beautiful and affordable 8x8 paperback edition.
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Book details

List price: $4.99
Copyright year: 2011
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 3/31/2011
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 32
Size: 8.00" wide x 8.25" long x 0.10" tall
Weight: 0.484
Language: English

Wilbur Monroe Leaf (aka Munro Leaf) (1905-1976) is an American author of children's literature who wrote and illustrated many books during his long career. His books were illustrated by a number of famous artists, including  Ludwig Bemelmans, Robert Lawson, and Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss). He is best known for  The Story of Ferdinand (1936).

Robert Lawson was born in 1892 in New York City. He studied art for three years under illustrator Howard Giles. His career as an illustrator began in 1914, when his illustration for a poem about the invasion of Belgium was published in Harper's Weekly. In 1922, he illustrated his first children's book, The Wonderful Adventures of Little Prince Toofat. Subsequently he illustrated dozens of children's books by other authors, including such well-known titles as The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and Mr. Popper's Penguins by Richard and Florence Atwater. He has illustrated as many as forty books by other authors, and another seventeen books that he himself was author of, including Ben and Me: An Astonishing Life of Benjamin Franklin By His Good Mouse Amos and Rabbit Hill. His work was widely admired, and he became the first, and so far only, person to be given both the Caldecott Medal (They Were Strong and Good, 1941) and the Newbery Medal (Rabbit Hill, 1945). Ben and Me earned a Lewis Carroll Shelf Award in 1961. Lawson died in 1957 at his home in Westport, Connecticut, in a house that he referred to as Rabbit Hill, since it had been the setting for his book of the same name. He was 64.