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Great Issues in American History, Vol. I From Settlement to Revolution, 1584-1776

ISBN-10: 0394705408

ISBN-13: 9780394705408

Edition: N/A

Authors: Clarence L. Ver Steeg, Richard Hofstadter, Richard Hofstadter

List price: $18.00
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Description:

This first volume of Great Issues in American History -- three volumes of documents that cover the history of America from its settlement to the present -- gives us a generous sampling from the major political controversies in the Colonial period. Included are such documents as Richard Hakluyt's "Discourse of Western Planting" (1584), "Letter from Christopher Columbus to the King and Queen of Spain" (undated, probably 1694), "The Third Virginia Charter" (1612), Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" (1776) and "The Declaration of independence" (July 4, 1776). Each has an explanatory headnote, and there are brief general introductions that set the selections in their historical context. In order to fit both Colonial and Early National courses, documents covering 1765-1776 appear at the end of this volume and again at the beginning of Volume II. Volume II From the Revolution to the Civil War, 1765-1865 Edited by Richard Hofstadter Volume III From Reconstruction to the Present Day, 1864-1981 Edited by Richard Hofstadter and Beatrice K. Hofstadter
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Book details

List price: $18.00
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/12/1969
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 512
Size: 4.50" wide x 7.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 0.638
Language: English

DeWitt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University from 1959 until the time of his death, Richard Hofstadter was one of the most influential historians in post--World War II America. His political, social, and intellectual histories raised serious questions about assumptions that had long been taken for granted and cast the American experience in an interesting new light. His 1948 work, The American Political Tradition, is an enduring classic study in political history. His 1955 work, The Age of Reform, which still commands respect among both historians and general readers, won him that year's Pulitzer Prize. A measure of Hofstadter's standing in literary and scholarly circles is the honors he received in 1964 for Anti-Intellectualism in American Life (1963)---Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction, the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize of Phi Beta Kappa, and the Sidney Hillman Prize Award. Hofstadter's greatest talent, however, may have been his ability to order complex events and issues and to synthesize from them a rational, constructively critical perspective on American history.