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Culture of Disbelief How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion

ISBN-10: 0385474989

ISBN-13: 9780385474986

Edition: N/A

Authors: Stephen L. Carter

List price: $18.00
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Description:

The Culture Of Disbelief has  been the subject of an enormous amount of media  attention from the first moment it was published.  Hugely successful in hardcover, the Anchor paperback  is sure to find a large audience as the  ever-increasing, enduring debate about the relationship of  church and state in America continues. In The  Culture Of Disbelief, Stephen Carter  explains how we can preserve the vital separation of  church and state while embracing rather than  trivializing the faith of millions of citizens or  treating religious believers with disdain. What makes  Carter's work so intriguing is that he uses liberal  means to arrive at what are often considered  conservative ends. Explaining how preserving a special  role for religious communities can strengthen our  democracy, The Culture Of Disbelief  recovers the long tradition of liberal religious  witness (for example, the antislavery,  antisegregation, and Vietnam-era antiwar movements). Carter  argues that the problem with the 1992 Republican  convention was not the fact of  open religious advocacy, but the political  positions being advocated.
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Book details

List price: $18.00
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 9/1/1994
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 352
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.836
Language: English

Stephen L. Carter was born in Washington, D.C. on October 26, 1954. He received a bachelor's degree in history from Stanford University in 1976 and a law degree from Yale University in 1979. After graduation, he served as a law clerk for Judge Spottswood W. Robinson, III, of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, and for Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. In 1982, he joined the Yale University faculty and is currently the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law. He is the author of numerous non-fiction works including Reflections of an Affirmative Action Baby (1991); The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion (1993); The Confirmation Mess: Cleaning Up the Federal Appointments Process (1994); Integrity (1996); The Dissent of the Governed: A Meditation on Law, Religion, and Loyalty (1998); Civility: Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy (1998); and God's Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in Politics (2000). He has also written several fiction works including The Emperor of Ocean Park and Jericho's Fall. He was the first non-theologian to receive the prestigious Louisville-Grawemeyer Award in religion.

Acknowledgments
The Separation of Faith and Self
The Culture of Disbelief
God as a Hobby
From Civil Religion to Civil Exclusion
Political Preaching
The "Christian Nation" and Other Horrors
The First Subject of the First Amendment
The Separation of Church and State
The Accommodation of Religion
Religious Autonomy in the Welfare State
In the Beginning
God: A Course of Study
The Clothed Public Square
(Dis)Believing in Faith
Matters of Life and Death
Religious Fascism
Postscript
Notes
Index