Skip to content

You've Changed Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity

ISBN-10: 0195385705

ISBN-13: 9780195385700

Edition: 2009

Authors: Laurie J. Shrage

Shipping box This item qualifies for FREE shipping.
Blue ribbon 30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee!
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
Carrot Coin icon
XP icon
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Description:

Is sex identity a feature of one's mind or body, and is it a relational or intrinsic property? Who is in the best position to know a person's sex, do we each have a true sex, and is a person's sex an alterable characteristic? When a person's sex assignment changes, has the old self disappeared and a new one emerged; or, has only the public presentation of one's self changed? "You've Changed" examines the philosophical questions raised by the phenomenon of sex reassignment, and brings together the essays of scholars known for their work in gender, sexuality, queer, and disability studies, feminist epistemology and science studies, and philosophical accounts of personal identity. An interdisciplinary contribution to the emerging field of transgender studies, it will be of interest to students and scholars in a number of disciplines.
Customers also bought

Book details

Copyright year: 2009
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/27/2009
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 304
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.814

Contributors
Introduction
Sex/Gender Transitions and Life-Changing Aspirations
Transsexuality and Contextual Identities
Tracing a Ghostly Memory in My Throat: Reflections on Ftm Feminist Voice and Agency
Transsexuality and Daseia Y. Cavers-Huff
The Sexual Schema: Transposition and Transgender in Phenomenology of Perception
Trans Identities and First-Person Authority
Queer Breasted Experience
Changing Race, Changing Sex: The Ethics of Self-Transformation
Artifice and Authenticity: Gender Technology and Agency in Two Jenny Saville Portraits
Sex and Miscibility
Who Do You Think You Are? When Should the Law Let You Be Who You Want to Be?
Index