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Cyclops

ISBN-10: 0195143035

ISBN-13: 9780195143034

Edition: 2001

Authors: Eur�pides, Heather McHugh, David Konstan, David Konstan

List price: $14.99
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Description:

The only extant satyr play of Euripides, the Cyclops abounds in lusty comedy and horror: Odysseus and his men, driven by storms onto Cyclops' shores, find that the Cyclops has aready enslaved a company of Greeks. When some of Odysseus' crew are seized and eaten by the cyclops Odysseus resorts to spectacular strategems to free his crew and escape the island. This distinguished poet's version of the CYCLOPS refreshes the work with all the salty humour, vigorous music, and dramatic shapeliness available in modern American English. McHugh, a prize-winning poet, and Konstan, a respected classicist, combine their talents to create this new addition to the Greek Tragedy in New Translations series. Each play in the series, meant for the non-specialist reader, is preceded by a critical introduction and is accompanied by notes designed to clarify obscure references and to explain the conventions of the Athenian stage.
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Book details

List price: $14.99
Copyright year: 2001
Publisher: Oxford University Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 4/19/2001
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 96
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.00" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.198
Language: English

Euripides, one of the three great Greek tragedians was born in Attica probably in 485 B.C. of well-to-do parents. In his youth he cultivated gymnastic pursuits and studied philosophy and rhetoric. Soon after he received recognition for a play that he had written, Euripides left Athens for the court of Archelaus, king of Macedonia. In his tragedies, Euripides represented individuals not as they ought to be but as they are. His excellence lies in the tenderness and pathos with which he invested many of his characters. Euripides' attitude toward the gods was iconoclastic and rationalistic; toward humans-notably his passionate female characters-his attitude was deeply sympathetic. In his dramas, Euripides separated the chorus from the action, which was the first step toward the complete elimination of the chorus. He used the prologue as an introduction and explanation. Although Euripides has been charged with intemperate use of the deus ex machina, by which artifice a god is dragged in abruptly at the end to resolve a situation beyond human powers, he created some of the most unforgettable psychological portraits. Fragments of about fifty-five plays survive; some were discovered as recently as 1906. Among his best-known plays are Alcestis (438 B.C.), Medea and Philoctetes (431 B.C.), Electra (417 B.C.), Iphigenia in Tauris (.413 B.C.), The Trojan Women (415 B.C.), and Iphigenia in Aulis Iphigenia (c.405 B.C.). Euripides died in Athens in 406. Shortly after his death his reputation rose and has never diminished.

Yusef Komunyakka's eleven books of poems include Thieves of Paradise, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Neon Vernacular, for which he received the Pulitzer Prize. He teaches at Princeton University and lives in New York City.

Introduction
Translator's Foreword
Characters
Cyclops
Notes on the Text
Glossary