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Selected Writings

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ISBN-10: 0142437042

ISBN-13: 9780142437049

Edition: 2002

Authors: Jose Marti, Esther Allen, Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria, Jos� Mart�

List price: $20.00
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Description:

José Martiacute (1853-1895) is the most renowned political and literary figure in the history of Cuba. A poet, essayist, orator, statesman, abolitionist, and the martyred revolutionary leader of Cuba's fight for independence from Spain, Martí lived in exile in New York for most of his adult life, earning his living as a foreign correspondent. Throughout the 1880s and early 1890s, Martí's were the eyes through which much of Latin America saw the United States. His impassioned, kaleidoscopic evocations of that period in U.S. history, the assassination of James Garfield, the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, the execution of the Chicago anarchists, the lynching of the Italians in New Orleans, and much more, bring it rushing back to life. Organized chronologically, this collection begins with his early writings, including a thundering account of his political imprisonment in Cuba at age sixteen. The middle section focuses on his journalism, which offers an image of the United States in the nineteenth century, its way of life and system of government, that rivals anything written by de Tocqueville, Dickens, Trollope, or any other European commentator. Including generous selections of his poetry and private notebooks, the book concludes with his astonishing, hallucinatory final masterpiece, "War Diaries", never before translated into English.
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Book details

List price: $20.00
Copyright year: 2002
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 4/30/2002
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 496
Size: 5.00" wide x 7.50" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

Marti is a symbol of Cuban independence, for he campaigned throughout his life for its liberation and finally died in the war against Spain. He was also an important literary figure and one of the founders of modernism. Rejecting the elaborate aestheticism of many modernists, he wrote in a simpler style based largely on folk poetry, as in "Ismaelillo" and "Versos Sencillos." Much of his poetry deals with the struggle for freedom and his political and emotional exile from his homeland. He was also an accomplished prose stylist in a much more intricate fashion and influenced the later development of the short story and essay. His writings, now collected, many of which were originally published in newspapers, are essential for an understanding of the Spanish American independence process.

Jose Marti: An Introduction
Chronology
Suggestions for Further Reading
Earliest Writings
Abdala
Letter to His Mother from Prison
Political Prison in Cuba
1871-1881
Notebooks 1-3
Early Journalism
The Poor Neighborhoods of Mexico City
Sarah Bernhardt
Impressions of America (by a very fresh Spaniard)
1882-1890
Poetry
Prologue to Juan Antonio Perez Bonalde's Poem of Niagara
Ismaelillo
Waking Dream/Sueno despierto
Fragrant Arms/Brazos fragantes
My Kinglet/Mi reyecillo
Son of My Soul/Hijo del alma
Free Verses/Versos libres
My Verses
The Swiss Father/El padre suizo
Famous Island/Isla famosa
Love in the City/Amor de ciudad grande
I Hate the Sea/Odio el mar
Winged Cup/Copa con alas
Notebooks 4-15
Undated Fragment
A Passion
from The Golden Age
Pin the Tail on the Donkey: A New Game and Some Old Ones
Letters from New York
Coney Island
The Trial of Guiteau
Prizefight
Emerson
Tributes to Karl Marx, Who Has Died
from La America
The Brooklyn Bridge
The Glossograph
Indigenous Art
Mexico, the United States, and Protectionism
Graduation Day
The Indians in the United States
The World's Biggest Explosion
Impressionist Painters
A Great Confederate Celebration
The Cutting Case
The Poet Walt Whitman
Class War in Chicago: A Terrible Drama
A Walking Marathon
New York Under Snow
Blaine's Night
A Chinese Funeral
Inauguration Day
Political Correspondence
Letter to Emilio Nunez
Letter to General Maximo Gomez
A Vindication of Cuba
1891-1894
Poetry
Simple Verses/Versos sencillos
Prologue
I (I am an honest man/Yo soy un hombre sincero)
III (I hate the masks and vices/Odio la mascara y vicio)
XXVIII (Past the manor with the tomb/Por la tumba del cortijo)
XXX (Blood-hued lightning cleaves/El rayo surca, sangriento)
XXXVI (Yes, I know: flesh/Ya se: de carne se puede)
XLV (I dream of marble cloisters/Sueno con claustros de marmol)
Notebooks 18-20
Letters from New York
Our America
The Lynching of the Italians
The Monetary Conference of the American Republics
A Town Sets a Black Man on Fire
from Patria
The Abolition of Slavery in Puerto Rico
My Race
To Cuba!
The Truth About the United States
1895
Politics
The Montecristi Manifesto
Final Correspondence
Letter to His Mother
Letter to Manuel Mercado
War Diaries
From Montecristi to Cap-Haitien
From Cap-Haitien to Dos Rios
Afterword
Notes
Index