Medium and the Light Reflections on Religion

ISBN-10: 1606089927

ISBN-13: 9781606089927

Edition: N/A

List price: $30.00
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Book details

List price: $30.00
Publisher: Wipf & Stock Publishers
Publication date: 3/1/2010
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 248
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.880
Language: English

A poetry professor turned media theorist---or media guru, as some in the press called him at the time---Marshall McLuhan startled television watchers during the 1960's with the notion that the medium they were enthralled by was doing more than transmitting messages---it was the message: Its rapid-fire format, mixing programs and advertisements, conveyed as much as---or more than---any single broadcast element. McLuhan grew up in the prairie country of the Canadian West and studied English at the University of Manitoba and Cambridge University. As television entered a period of huge growth during the 1950's, McLuhan, then a college professor, became interested in advertising. He thought of it as something to be taken seriously as a new culture form, beyond its obvious capability of selling products. That interest led to his increasing speculation about what media did to audiences. In his unpredictable modern poetry classes at the University of Toronto, he spoke more and more of media. The students he taught were the television generation, the first to grow up with the medium. Many were fascinated by McLuhan's provocative observations that a medium of communication radically alters the experience being communicated. A society, he said, is shaped more by the style than by the content of its media. Thus, the linear, sequential style of printing established a linear, sequential style of thinking, in which one thing is considered after another in orderly fashion: it shaped a culture in which (objective) reason predominated and experience was isolated, compartmentalized, and repeatable. In contrast, the low-density images of television, composed of a mosaic of light and dark dots, established a style of response in which it is necessary to unconsciously reconfigure the dots immediately in order to derive meaning from them. It has shaped a culture in which (subjective) emotion predominates and experience is holistic and unrepeatable. Since television (and the other electronic media) transcends space and time, the world is becoming a global village---a community in which distance and isolation are overcome. McLuhan was crisp and assured in his pronouncements and impatient with those who failed to grasp their import. McLuhan's most famous saying, "the medium is the message," was explicated in the first chapter of his most successful book, "Understanding Media," published in 1966 and still in print. It sold very well for a rather abstruse book and brought McLuhan widespread attention in intellectual circles. The media industry responded by seeking his advice and enthusiastically disseminating his ideas in magazines and on television. These ideas caused people to perceive their environment, particularly their media environment, in radically new ways. It was an unsettling experience for some, liberating for others. Though McLuhan produced some useful insights, he was given to wild generalizations and flagrant exaggerations. Some thought him a charlatan, and he always felt himself an outcast at the university, at least partly because of his disdain for print culture and opposition to academic conventions. He never seemed quite as energetic after an operation in 1967 to remove a huge brain tumor, but he continued to work and teach until he suffered a stroke in 1979. He died a year later. Though today his writings are not discussed as much by the general public, his thesis is still considered valid and his ideas have become widely accepted.

Eric McLuhan is an author, editor, and teacher. He has worked closely with Marshall McLuhan, with whom he studied Finnegans Wake . He now lectures and writes on media and society, and edits the journal McLuhan Studies .

Preface
Introduction
Conversion
G. K. Chesterton: A Practical Mystic
"The Great Difficulty About Truth": Two Letters to
"Spiritual Acts": Letter to
The Church's Understanding of Media
Communication Media: Makers of the Modern World
Keys to the Electronic Revolution: First Conversation with
The De-Romanization of the American Catholic Church
"Our Only Hope Is Apocalypse"
"The Logos Reaching Across Barriers": Letters to Ong, Mole, Maritain, and Culkin
International Motley and Religious Costume
Electric Consciousness and the Church
"A Peculiar War to Fight": Letter to
Religion and Youth: Second Conversation with
Vatican II, Liturgy, and the Media
Liturgy and the Microphone
Liturgy and Media: Do Americans Go to Church to Be Alone?
"Achieving Relevance": Letters to Mole and Sheed
Liturgy and Media: Third Conversation with
Tomorrow's Church
Catholic Humanism and Modern Letters
The Christian in the Electronic Age
Wyndham Lewis: Lemuel in Lilliput
The God-Making Machines of the Modern World
Confronting the Secular: Letter to
Tomorrow's Church: Fourth Conversation with
Note on Thomas Nashe
Editors' Note on Newman, Eliot, and Tradition
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