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My Bondage and My Freedom

ISBN-10: 1593083017
ISBN-13: 9781593083014
Edition: N/A
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Description: Born a slave,Frederick Douglaseducated himself, escaped, and became one of the greatest social leaders in American history. Although usually identified with the monumentalNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Douglass  More...

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Book details

List price: $9.95
Publisher: Barnes & Noble, Incorporated
Publication date: 1/30/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 432
Size: 5.25" wide x 7.75" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 0.792

Born a slave,Frederick Douglaseducated himself, escaped, and became one of the greatest social leaders in American history. Although usually identified with the monumentalNarrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Douglass produced two additional autobiographies, the second of which he calledMy Bondage and My Freedom. A richer, deeper, and far more ambiguous work than the earlierNarrative,My Bondage and My Freedomreveals Douglass’s increased intellectual sophistication and maturity. In the decade that had elapsed since Douglass wroteNarrative, he had broken away from his antislavery mentors, successfully toured England, and established himself as an inspired speaker and writer. With the publication ofMy Bondage and My Freedomin 1855, Douglass became the country’s foremost spokesman for American blacks—free and enslaved—during the tense and politically charged years preceding the Civil War. One of the highlights ofMy Bondage and My Freedomis the appendix, which contains excerpts from several of Douglass’s speeches, including perhaps his most famous, “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

Born a slave in Maryland in about 1817, Frederick Douglass never became accommodated to being held in bondage. He secretly learned to read, although slaves were prohibited from doing so. He fought back against a cruel slave-breaker and finally escaped to New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1838 at about the age of 21. Despite the danger of being sent back to his owner if discovered, Douglass became an agent and eloquent orator for the Massachusetts Antislavery Society. He lectured extensively in both England and the United States. As an ex-slave, his words had tremendous impact on his listeners. In 1845 Douglass wrote his autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, which increased his fame. Concerned that he might be sent back to slavery, he went to Europe. He spent two years in England and Ireland speaking to antislavery groups. Douglass returned to the United States a free man and settled in Rochester, New York, where he founded a weekly newspaper, The North Star, in 1847. In the newspaper he wrote articles supporting the antislavery cause and the cause of human rights. He once wrote, "The lesson which [the American people] must learn, or neglect to do so at their own peril, is that Equal Manhood means Equal Rights, and further, that the American people must stand for each and all for each without respect to color or race." During the Civil War, Douglass worked for the Underground Railroad, the secret route of escape for slaves. He also helped recruit African-Americans soldiers for the Union army. After the war, he continued to write and to speak out against injustice. In addition to advocating education for freed slaves, he served in several government posts, including United States representative to Haiti. In 1855, a longer version of his autobiography appeared, and in 1895, the year of Douglass's death, a completed version was published. A best-seller in its own time, it has since become available in numerous editions and languages.

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