x

Our Privacy Policy has changed. By using this site, you agree to the Privacy Policy.

Plato Gorgias and Aristotle Rhetoric

ISBN-10: 1585102997
ISBN-13: 9781585102990
Edition: 2009
Buy it from $24.50
eBook available
30 day, 100% satisfaction guarantee

If an item you ordered from TextbookRush does not meet your expectations due to an error on our part, simply fill out a return request and then return it by mail within 30 days of ordering it for a full refund of item cost.

Learn more about our returns policy

Description: Plato's Gorgias contains a classical attack on rhetoric and Aristotle's Rhetoric is a classical defense of it. This pairing of the two books in one volume allows the reader to enter into a philosophic exchange of unusual depth. Complete with a  More...

New Starting from $24.50
eBooks Starting from $12.95
Buy
what's this?
Rush Rewards U
Members Receive:
coins
coins
You have reached 400 XP and carrot coins. That is the daily max!

Study Briefs

Limited time offer: Get the first one free! (?)

All the information you need in one place! Each Study Brief is a summary of one specific subject; facts, figures, and explanations to help you learn faster.

Add to cart
Study Briefs
History of Western Art Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
History of World Philosophies Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
American History Volume 1 Online content $4.95 $1.99
Add to cart
Study Briefs
History of Western Music Online content $4.95 $1.99

Customers also bought

Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading
Loading

Book details

Copyright year: 2009
Publisher: Hackett Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date: 10/15/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 298
Size: 6.25" wide x 9.25" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.166
Language: English

Plato's Gorgias contains a classical attack on rhetoric and Aristotle's Rhetoric is a classical defense of it. This pairing of the two books in one volume allows the reader to enter into a philosophic exchange of unusual depth. Complete with a thorough introduction and designed to emphasize the illumination each work sheds on the other, translator Joe Sachs argues that the two texts constitute a complex conversation rather than a mere opposition. The relation between the thinking of Plato and Aristotle can be understood directly through the study of this highly focused exchange. Book jacket.

Plato was born c. 427 B.C. in Athens, Greece, to an aristocratic family very much involved in political government. Pericles, famous ruler of Athens during its golden age, was Plato's step-father. Plato was well educated and studied under Socrates, with whom he developed a close friendship. When Socrates was publically executed in 399 B.C., Plato finally distanced himself from a career in Athenian politics, instead becoming one of the greatest philosophers of Western civilization. Plato extended Socrates's inquiries to his students, one of the most famous being Aristotle. Plato's The Republic is an enduring work, discussing justice, the importance of education, and the qualities needed for rulers to succeed. Plato felt governors must be philosophers so they may govern wisely and effectively. Plato founded the Academy, an educational institution dedicated to pursuing philosophic truth. The Academy lasted well into the 6th century A.D., and is the model for all western universities. Its formation is along the lines Plato laid out in The Republic. Many of Plato's essays and writings survive to this day. Plato died in 347 B.C. at the age of 80.

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

Introduction
The Gorgias of Plato
Introductory conversation (447A-448C)
Socrates and Gorgias (448D-461B)
Socrates and Polus (461B-481B)
Callicles' interruption and speech (481B-486D)
Socrates and Callicles (486D-523A)
Socrates' concluding speech (523A-527E)
The Rhetoric of Aristotle
Chapter Summaries
Book I: (Rhetorical speech: its nature, its kinds, and the opinions it is based on)
Book II: (Design of speeches: passions and predispositions of audiences and techniques of argument)
Book III: (Presentation in speaking: wording and arrangement)
Glossary
Index

×
Free shipping on orders over $35*

*A minimum purchase of $35 is required. Shipping is provided via FedEx SmartPost® and FedEx Express Saver®. Average delivery time is 1 – 5 business days, but is not guaranteed in that timeframe. Also allow 1 - 2 days for processing. Free shipping is eligible only in the continental United States and excludes Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico. FedEx service marks used by permission."Marketplace" orders are not eligible for free or discounted shipping.

Learn more about the TextbookRush Marketplace.

×