Persuasive Technology Using Computers to Change What We Think and Do

ISBN-10: 1558606432
ISBN-13: 9781558606432
Edition: 2003
Authors: B. J. Fogg
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Description: B.J. Fogg proposes conceptual examples of possible new technologies, discusses ethical implications of persuasive computing and offers theoretical insights into persuasion processes.

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Book details

List price: $59.95
Copyright year: 2003
Publisher: Elsevier Science & Technology Books
Publication date: 12/16/2002
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 312
Size: 8.25" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.474
Language: English

B.J. Fogg proposes conceptual examples of possible new technologies, discusses ethical implications of persuasive computing and offers theoretical insights into persuasion processes.

B.J. Fogg directs research and design at Stanford University's Persuasive Technology Lab. An experimental psychologist, Dr. Fogg also teaches in Stanford's Department of Computer Science and School of Education. He holds several patents, and his work has been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal.

Foreword
Preface
Introduction: Persuasion in the Digital Age
Persuasion on the Web
Beyond the Web
The Emergence of "Captology"
Potential and Pitfalls
Advantage over Traditional Media: Interactivity
Advantages over Human Persuaders
Computers Are Persistent
Computers Allow Anonymity
Computers Can Store, Access, and Manipulate Huge Volumes of Data
Computers Can Use Many Modalities
Computer Software Can Scale
Computers Can Be Ubiquitous
How to Read This Book
Notes and References
Overview of Captology
Defining Persuasion
Focus on the Human-Computer Relationship
Persuasion Is Based on Intentions, Not Outcomes
Levels of Persuasion: Macro and Micro
Microsuasion on the Web
Microsuasion in Video Games
Captology: Summary of Key Terms and Concepts
Notes and References
The Functional Triad: Computers in Persuasive Roles
The Functional Triad: Roles Computers Play
Computers as Tools
Computers as Media
Computers as Social Actors
Applying the Functional Triad to Captology
Research and Design Applications
Notes and References
Computers as Persuasive Tools
Seven Types of Persuasive Technology Tools
Reduction Technology: Persuading through Simplifying
Simplifying Political Input
Tunneling Technology: Guided Persuasion
Ethical Concerns
Tailoring Technology: Persuasion through Customization
Ethical Concerns
Tailoring Information for Context
Suggestion Technology: Intervening at the Right Time
Timing Is Critical
Self-Monitoring Technology: Taking the Tedium Out of Tracking
Eliminating a Language Quirk
Surveillance Technology: Persuasion through Observation
Surveillance Must Be Overt
Rewarding through Surveillance
Public Compliance without Private Acceptance
Conditioning Technology: Reinforcing Target Behaviors
Technology Applications of Operant Conditioning
Operant Conditioning in Computer Games
Applying Periodic Reinforcement
Shaping Complex Behaviors
The Right Persuasive Tool(s) for the Job
Notes and References
Computers as Persuasive Media: Simulation
Persuading through Computer Simulation
Cause-and-Effect Simulations: Offering Exploration and Insight
HIV Roulette: A Cause-and-Effect Simulator
Rockett's New School: Learning Social Skills
Implications of Designer Bias
Environment Simulations: Creating Spaces for Persuasive Experiences
LifeFitness VR Rowing Machine: Competing in a Virtual Environment
The Tectrix VR Bike: Pedaling to Explore a Virtual Environment
Managing Asthma in a Simulated Environment
Using Simulation to Overcome Phobias
In My Steps: Helping Doctors to Empathize with Cancer Patients
Object Simulations: Providing Experiences in Everyday Contexts
Baby Think It Over: An Infant Simulator
Drunk Driving Simulator
Notes and References
Computers as Persuasive Social Actors
Five Types of Social Cues
Persuasion through Physical Cues
The Impact of Physical Attractiveness
Using Psychological Cues to Persuade
The Stanford Similarity Studies
The Personality Study
The Affiliation Study
Ethical and Practical Considerations
The Oscilloscope Study
Influencing through Language
Persuading through Praise
Social Dynamics
The Reciprocity Study
Persuading by Adopting Social Roles
Computers in Roles of Authority
Social Cues: Handle with Care
Notes and References
Credibility and Computers
What Is "Credibility"?
A Simple Definition
Trustworthiness
Expertise
Combinations of Trustworthiness and Expertise
When Credibility Matters in Human-Computer Interaction
Instructing or Advising
Reporting Measurements
Providing Information and Analysis
Reporting on Work Performed
Reporting on Their Own State
Running Simulations
Rendering Virtual Environments
Four Types of Credibility
Presumed Credibility
Surface Credibility
Reputed Credibility
Earned Credibility
Dynamics of Computer Credibility
Errors in Credibility Evaluations
Appropriate Credibility Perceptions
The Future of Computer Credibility
Notes and References
Credibility and the World Wide Web
The Importance of Web Credibility
Variability of Web Credibility
Two Sides of Web Credibility
The Stanford Web Credibility Studies
A Few Words about Our Findings
Interpreting the Data
Trustworthiness and Expertise on the Web
Trustworthiness and Web Credibility
Elements that Increase Credibility: Significant Changes in 2002 Results
Elements that Decrease Credibility: Significant Changes in 2002 Results
Expertise and Web Site Credibility
Elements that Increase Credibility: Significant Changes in 2002 Results
Elements that Decrease Credibility: No Significant Changes in 2002
The Four Types of Web Credibility
Presumed Credibility on the Web
Reputed Credibility on the Web
Awards
Seals of Approval
Links from Credible Sources
Word-of-Mouth Referrals
Surface Credibility on the Web
Design Matters
Enhancing Surface Credibility
Earned Credibility on the Web
The Interaction Is Easy
The Information Is Personalized
The Service Is Responsive to Customer Issues
The Web Credibility Framework
The Web Credibility Grid
The Future of Web Credibility Research and Design
Notes and References
Increasing Persuasion through Mobility and Connectivity
Intervening at the Right Time and Place
The Study Buddy
HydroTech
An Emerging Frontier for Persuasive Technology
Persuasion through Mobile Technology
Examining Mobile Health Applications
The Kairos Factor
The Convenience Factor
Simplifying Mobile Devices to Increase Persuasion Power
Wedded to Mobile Technology
Motivating Users to Achieve Their Own Goals
The Importance of Experience Design
Persuasion through Connected Technology
Leveraging Current, Contingent, and Coordinated Information
Connected Products: Leveraging Social Influence
Persuading through Social Facilitation
The Power of Social Comparison
Leveraging Conformity--and Resistance
Applying Social Learning Theory
Modeling Behavior at QuitNet.com
Modeling at epinions.com
Persuading through Intrinsic Motivation
AlternaTV: Leveraging Group-Level Intrinsic Motivators
The Future of Mobile and Connected Persuasive Technology
Notes and References
The Ethics of Persuasive Technology
Is Persuasion Unethical?
Unique Ethical Concerns Related to Persuasive Technology
The Novelty of the Technology Can Mask Its Persuasive Intent
Persuasive Technology Can Exploit the Positive Reputation of Computers
Computers Can Be Proactively Persistent
Computers Control the Interactive Possibilities
Computers Can Affect Emotions But Can't Be Affected by Them
Computers Cannot Shoulder Responsibility
Intentions, Methods, and Outcomes: Three Areas Worthy of Inquiry
Intentions: Why Was the Product Created?
Methods of Persuasion
Using Emotions to Persuade
Methods That Always Are Unethical
Methods That Raise Red Flags
Operant Conditioning
Surveillance
Outcomes: Intended and Unintended
Responsibility for Unintended Outcomes
When Persuasion Targets Vulnerable Groups
Stakeholder Analysis: A Methodology for Analyzing Ethics
List All of the Stakeholders
List What Each Stakeholder Has to Gain
List What Each Stakeholder Has to Lose
Evaluate Which Stakeholder Has the Most to Gain
Evaluate Which Stakeholder Has the Most to Lose
Determine Ethics by Examining Gains and Losses in Terms of Values
Acknowledge the Values and Assumptions You Bring to Your Analysis
Education Is Key
Notes and References
Captology: Looking Forward
Five Future Trends in Captology
Pervasive Persuasive Technologies
Growth Beyond Buying and Branding
Healthcare
Education
Increase in Specialized Persuasive Devices
Increased Focus on Influence Strategies
A New Focus on Influence Tactics
Looking Forward Responsibly
Notes and References
Summary of Principles
Figure Credits
Index
About the Author

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