Microbe

ISBN-10: 1555813208
ISBN-13: 9781555813208
Edition: 2006
List price: $89.95
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Description: Microbe, a brand-new, general microbiology textbook intended for upper-division undergraduate and beginning graduate courses, is an exciting introduction to the world of microbes. With a distinct ecological and evolutionary orientation, Microbe  More...

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Book details

List price: $89.95
Copyright year: 2006
Publisher: ASM Press
Publication date: 12/15/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 558
Size: 8.50" wide x 11.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 4.884
Language: English

Microbe, a brand-new, general microbiology textbook intended for upper-division undergraduate and beginning graduate courses, is an exciting introduction to the world of microbes. With a distinct ecological and evolutionary orientation, Microbe invites readers to partake of the most current advances in the field. Written by prominent scientists with practical teaching, textbook writing, and research experience, this new textbook will engage students in the learning process with its clear, reader-friendly style and unique perspective of the field. Microbe is paradigm-driven rather than fact-driven. Key concepts are illustrated by inspiring examples that convey the excitement of the field. This is not a compendium of facts, but rather a textbook in the older, traditional sense: a book that can be used for studying rather than for looking up factual information. The book is divided into seven sections covering the most pertinent information related to the study of microbes, including microbial activity; structure and function; growth, inheritance, physiology, and diversity; and biological interactions. Each chapter concludes with thought-provoking study questions, for which answers are listed in the back of the book. Microbe is accompanied by a dedicated Web site featuring links to additional information and animation and video clips related to material covered in the book, Sidebars throughout the text guide readers to designated links that are easily accessed through the Microbe homepage. The Web site will be monitored and updated regularly by the authors.

Dr. Schaechter is a Distinguished Professor, Emeritus at Tufts University, where he served as chairman of the Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology from 1970 to 1993. He has worked on bacterial growth physiology and the relationship of the chromosome and the bacterial cell membrane. He has authored ten treatises and textbooks, most in collaboration with others, plus a book for the general public, In the Company of Mushrooms. He has served as President of the American Society for Microbiology. Currently, he is Adjunct Professor Emeritus, Biology Department, at San Diego State University and Visiting Scholar at the University of California, San Diego.

Preface
About the Authors
Study Aids
Microbial activity
The world of microbes
Introduction
What is a microbe?
Having a long past
Being small
Being many
Growing and persisting
Colonizing every niche and making Earth inhabitable
Shaping the planet
Making a living
Cooperating for complex endeavors
Conclusions
Study questions
Structure and function
Prokaryotic cell structure and function: envelopes and appendages
Prokaryotic cells
Microscopes
Prokaryotes have complex envelopes and appendages
The cell membrane
How the cell membrane is protected
Capsules, flagella, and pili: how prokaryotes cope in certain environments
Study questions
Prokaryotic cell structure and function: the cell interior
General observations
The nucleoid
The cytoplasm
Inclusions and vesicles
Conclusions
Study questions
Growth
Growth of microbial populations
Introduction
How to measure growth of a bacterial culture
When should the growth rate be determined?
The law of growth
Balanced growth
Continuous culture
How is the physiology of the cells affected by the growth rate?
Effects of temperature, hydrostatic pressure, osmotic strength, and pH
Conclusions
Study questions
Making a cell
Introduction
Growth metabolism: making life from nonlife
Framework of growth metabolism
Global effects of growth metabolism
Summary and plan
Study questions
Fueling
Overview of fueling reactions
Getting energy and reducing power
Making precursor metabolites: heterotrophy
Making precursor metabolites: autotrophy
Summary
Study questions
Biosynthesis
Some general observations
Assimilation of nitrogen
Assimilation of sulfur
Assimilation of phosphorus
Pathways to building blocks
Summary
Study questions
Building macromolecules
Introduction
DNA
RNA
Protein
Envelope formation
Concluding remarks
Study questions
The cell division cycle
Introduction
Strategies for studying the bacterial cell cycle
DNA replication during the cell cycle
How is DNA replication regulated?
Cell division
The connection between cell division and DNA replication
Cell division and plasmid replication
The prokaryotic equivalent of mitosis
Study questions
Inheritance
Genetics
Introduction
Exchange of DNA among prokaryotes
Mutation and sources of genetic variation among prokaryotes
Genomics
Conclusions
Study questions
Evolution
Overview
Sequence of bases in macromolecules
The universal ancestor
Origin of life
Mechanisms of bacterial evolution
Early eukaryotes and endosymbiosis
Evolution of molecules
Conclusions
Study questions
Physiology
Coordination and regulation
Introduction
Evidence for coordination of metabolic reactions
Two modes of regulation
Modulation of protein activity
Modulation of protein amounts
Cooperative interaction of regulatory devices
Summary and conclusions: networks for coordination and response
Study questions
Succeeding in the environment
Microbes in their habitat
Coping with stress as individual cells
Coping with stress by community effort
Conclusions
Study questions
Differentiation and development
Overview
Endospores
Development of Caulobacter crescentus
Development of myxobacteria
Other bacteria that undergo differentiation and development
Summary
Study questions
Diversity
Prokaryotic microbes
Introduction
Making order of prokaryotic diversity
Prokaryotic species
Extent of prokaryotic diversity
Higher taxa of prokaryotes
Archaea
Bacteria
Conclusions
Study questions
Eukaryotic microbes
Introduction
Fungi
Protists
Conclusions
Study questions
Viruses, viroids, and prions
Introduction
Size and shape
Ecology and classification
Viral replication
Lysogeny and integration into the host genome
Viroids and prions
Conclusions
Study questions
Interactions
Ecology
Overview
Methods of microbial ecology
Biogeochemical cycles
Solid substrates
Microbial ecosystems
The future of microbial ecology
Conclusions
Study questions
Symbiosis, predation, and antibiosis
Symbiosis
Behavioral changes due to parasitism
Predation
Antibiotics and bacteriocins
Conclusions
Study questions
Infection: the vertebrate host
Introduction
Host defenses
Conclusions
Study questions
Infection: the microbe
Introduction
Case reports
Conclusions
Study questions
Microbes and human history
Introduction
How infectious diseases change
Microbial agents of warfare
Coping with danger in a microbial world
Conclusion
Suggested reading
Study questions
Putting microbes to work
Introduction
Various uses of microbes
Making better wines: the malolactic fermentation
Protecting plants and making snow: ice-minus bacteria
Using microbes to make protein drugs: insulin and human growth hormone (hGH)
Microbial enzymes: sweeteners from corn
Biological insecticides: Bt
Undoing pollution: bioremediation
Conclusion
Study questions
Coda
Glossary
Answers to Study Questions
Figure and Table Credits
Index

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