American Politics in the Gilded Age, 1868-1900

ISBN-10: 0882959336

ISBN-13: 9780882959337

Edition: 1997

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Book details

List price: $24.95
Copyright year: 1997
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated
Publication date: 1/30/1997
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 192
Size: 5.75" wide x 8.25" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.660
Language: English

Robert W. Cherny is a professor of history at San Francisco State University and the author, co-author, or editor of numerous books, includingAmerican Politics in the Gilded Age, 1868–1900, and, with William Issel, ofSan Francisco, 1865–1932: Politics, Power, and Urban Development. Mary Ann Irwin is an instructor in the California community college system and the author or coeditor of several books and articles, includingWomen and Gender in the American West: Jensen-Miller Essays from the Coalition for Western Women’s History. Ann Marie Wilson is a College Fellow and Lecturer on History at Harvard University. Her first journal article received the 2010 Fishel-Calhoun Prize of the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era.   Contributors: Cameron Binkley, Eunice Eichelberger, Susan Englander, Linda Heidenreich, Mildred Nichols Hamilton, Jarrod Harrison, Sandra L. Henderson, Mark Hopkins, Teresa Hurley, Mary Ann Irwin, Michelle Kleehammer, Rebecca Mead, Joshua Paddison, and Ann Marie Wilson.

The son of an attorney who practiced before the U.S. Supreme Court, John Hope Franklin was born in Rentiesville, Oklahoma on January 2, 1915. He received a B. A. from Fisk University in 1935 and a master's degree in 1936 and a Ph.D. in 1941 from Harvard University. During his career in education, he taught at a numerous institutions including Brooklyn College, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and Duke University. He also had teaching stints in Australia, China, and Zimbabwe. He has written numerous scholarly works including The Militant South, 1800-1861 (1956); Reconstruction After the Civil War (1961); The Emancipation Proclamation (1963); and The Color Line: Legacy for the 21st Century (1993). His comprehensive history From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans (1947) is generally acknowledged to be the basic survey of African American history. He received numerous awards during his lifetime including the Medal of Freedom in 1995 and the John W. Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanities in 2006. He worked with Thurgood Marshall's team of lawyers in their effort to end segregation in the 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education and participated in the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was president of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Studies Association. He was also a founding member of the Black Academy of Arts and served on the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the Committee on International Exchange of Scholars. He died of congestive heart failure on March 25, 2009 at the age of 94.

Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Domain and Power of Party
Parties, Elections, and Patronage
Parties, the State, and Public Policy
The Major Parties: The Republicans and The Democrats
On the Periphery of Party Politics: Mugwumps, Suffragists, Prohibitionists, Grangers, Greenbackers , and Laborites
The Deadlock of National Politics, 1868—1890
Grant: The Emergence of Deadlock, 1868—1876
Hayes: The Confirmation of Deadlock, 1876—1880
Garfield and Arthur: The Deadlock Continue, 1880—1884
Cleveland: The Deadlock Lengthens, 1884—1888
Breaking the Deadlock? Harrison and the Fifty-first Congress, 1888—1890
Political Upheaval, 189—1900
The Emergence of Populism, 1890—1892
The Dividend Democrats Fail to Govern, 1893—1896
Republican Resurgence and Democratic Downfall: The Battle of the Standards, 1896
Conclusion: An End and Many Beginnings
Illustrations and Maps follow page
Appendix: Tables
Farm Production and Crop Prices, 1865—1900
Popular and Electoral Vote for President, 1868—1904
Electoral Votes by Selected Regions and States
Party Strength in Congress, 1868—1904
Federal Income and Expenses, Including Customs Receipts
Bibliographical Essay
Index
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