Man Who Came to Dinner

ISBN-10: 0822207257
ISBN-13: 9780822207252
Edition: N/A
List price: $9.00 Buy it from $4.88
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Description: THE STORY: Sheridan Whiteside, having dined at the home of the Stanleys, slips on their doorstep, breaking his hip. A tumultuous six weeks of confinement follow. The Stanley living room is monopolized by the irascible invalid; ex-convicts are  More...

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Book details

List price: $9.00
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Incorporated
Publication date: 10/1/1939
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 90
Size: 5.25" wide x 7.75" long x 0.25" tall
Weight: 0.462
Language: English

THE STORY: Sheridan Whiteside, having dined at the home of the Stanleys, slips on their doorstep, breaking his hip. A tumultuous six weeks of confinement follow. The Stanley living room is monopolized by the irascible invalid; ex-convicts are invited to meals; and transatlantic calls bring a $784 phone bill. The arrival of strange gifts from his friends further destroys domestic tranquility. It would take a stoical housewife to harbor penguins in her library, an octopus in her cellar, and 10,000 cockroaches in her kitchen. When Maggie, his secretary, falls in love with the reporter, Bert Jefferson, Whiteside summons a glamorous actress, Lorraine, to win the affections of the young man. Knowing the girl's charms, Maggie enlists the aid of a clever impersonator who, affecting the voice of Lord Bottomley, whom the actress hopes to marry, asks her by phone to return to him and be married. The ruse almost works, but Whiteside, becoming suspicious, finds that no calls have come through from London. In revenge, Lorraine suggests a three-week rewrite on a play of Bert's in which she feigns great interest. Lake Placid is to furnish the quiet for his inspiration, and she is to be his collaborator. The unexpected arrival of a mummy case, just as the relenting Whiteside is frantically seeking to get rid of Lorraine, furnishes a malicious idea. Tricking her into stepping into the case, he shuts the lid and blackmails his host into having the case carried to the airport, preparatory to a round-the-world cruise. Whiteside departs from the Stanley's home triumphantly, but a second later a crash is heard-he has again slipped and fallen!

Kaufman, was born in Pittsburgh, attended law school for two years, failed as a business person, and became a humorist for Franklin P. Adams's column before joining the New York Times, whose drama editor he became in the 1920s. Kaufman was sole author of one long play and two one-act plays, including the popular The Butter and Egg Man (1926), but he collaborated on more than 25 plays, most importantly with Moss Hart, but also with Marc Connelly, Edna Ferber, and others, including Ring Lardner and John P. Marquand. These plays range from the hilarious madness of Cocoanuts (1929) and Animal Crackers (1928), two Marx Brothers shows that Kaufman worked on, to the comic pathos of Stage Door (1936) (with Edna Ferber). Commenting on why he did not write true satire, Kaufman said, "Satire is what closes Saturday night." Kaufman, Morris Ryskind, and Ira Gershwin won the Pulitzer Prize for drama for Of Thee I Sing (1932) and Kaufman and Hart for You Can't Take It with You (1937).

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