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Shakespeare Wars Clashing Scholars, Public Fiascoes, Palace Coups

ISBN-10: 0812978366
ISBN-13: 9780812978360
Edition: N/A
Authors: Ron Rosenbaum
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Description: “[Ron Rosenbaum] is one of the most original journalists and writers of our time.” –David Remnick InThe Shakespeare Wars, Ron Rosenbaum gives readers an unforgettable way of rethinking the greatest works of the human imagination. As he did in his  More...

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Book details

List price: $18.00
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 1/8/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 624
Size: 5.20" wide x 7.95" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 0.946
Language: English

“[Ron Rosenbaum] is one of the most original journalists and writers of our time.” –David Remnick InThe Shakespeare Wars, Ron Rosenbaum gives readers an unforgettable way of rethinking the greatest works of the human imagination. As he did in his groundbreaking Explaining Hitler, he shakes up much that we thought we understood about a vital subject and renews our sense of excitement and urgency. He gives us a Shakespeare book like no other. Rather than raking over worn-out fragments of biography, Rosenbaum focuses on cutting-edge controversies about the true source of Shakespeare’s enchantment and illumination–the astonishing language itself. How best to unlock the secrets of its spell? With quicksilver wit and provocative insight, Rosenbaum takes readers into the midst of fierce battles among the most brilliant Shakespearean scholars and directors over just how to delve deeper into the Shakespearean experience–deeper into the mind of Shakespeare. Was Shakespeare the one-draft wonder ofShakespeare in Love? Or was he rather–as an embattled faction of textual scholars now argues–a different kind of writer entirely: a conscientious reviser of his greatest plays? Must we then revise our way of reading, staging, and interpreting such works asHamletandKing Lear? Rosenbaum pursues key partisans in these debates from the high tables of Oxford to a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop in a strip mall in the Deep South. He makes ostensibly arcane textual scholarship intensely seductive–and sometimes even explicitly sexual. At an academic “Pleasure Seminar” in Bermuda, for instance, he examines one scholar’s quest to find an orgasm in Romeo and Juliet. Rosenbaum shows us great directors as Shakespearean scholars in their own right: We hear Peter Brook–perhaps the most influential Shakespearean director of the past century–disclose his quest for a “secret play” hidden within the Bard’s comedies and dramas. We listen to Sir Peter Hall, founder of the Royal Shakespeare Company, as he launches into an impassioned, table-pounding fury while discussing how the means of unleashing the full intensity of Shakespeare’s language has been lost–and how to restore it. Rosenbaum’s hilarious inside account of “the Great Shakespeare ‘Funeral Elegy’ Fiasco,” a man-versus-computer clash, illustrates the iconic struggle to define what is and isn’t “Shakespearean.” And he demonstrates the way Shakespearean scholars such as Harold Bloom can become great Shakespearean characters in their own right. The Shakespeare Warsoffers a thrilling opportunity to engage with Shakespeare’s work at its deepest levels. Like Explaining Hitler, this book is destined to revolutionize the way we think about one of the overwhelming obsessions of our time. From the Hardcover edition.

William Lawrence Shirer (February 23, 1904 - December 28, 1993) was an American journalist, war correspondent, and historian, who wrote The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, a history of Nazi Germany that has been read by many and cited in scholarly works for more than 50 years. Shirer was born in Chicago and graduated from Coe. Originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and the International News Service, Shirer was the first reporter hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a CBS radio team of journalists, and he became known for his broadcasts from Berlin, from the rise of the Nazi dictatorship through the first year of World War II (1940). With Murrow, he organized the first broadcast world news roundup, a format still followed by news broadcasts. Shirer wrote more than a dozen books including Berlin Diary (published in 1941); The Collapse of the Third Republic (1969) and a three-volume autobiography, Twentieth Century Journey (1976 to 1990). Shirer received a 1946 Peabody Award for Outstanding Reporting and Interpretation of News for his work at CBS. His book, The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, won the 1961 National Book Award for Nonfiction and Carey-Thomas Award for non-fiction.Ron Rosenbaum is the bestselling author of Explaining Hitler and The Shakespeare Wars and has written or edited six other books. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Harper's, The Atlantic, and The New Yorker. He writes a column for Slate and lives in New York City.

Preface: Why?
The Bottom of Shakespeare's Secrets
The Dream Induction
Civil Wars among the Textual Scholars
One Hamlet or Three?
A Digressive Comic Interlude Featuring Shakespeare's Ambiguously Revised Testimony in the Wigmakers' Lawsuit
"Look There, Look There...": The Scandal of Lear's Last Words
The War over What Is-and What Isn't-"Shakespearean"
The Great Shakespeare "Funeral Elegy" Fiasco
The Indian, the Judean and Hand D
The Promise and Perils of Shakespearean "Originalism"
The Search for the Shakespearean in a Delicate Pause
The Spell of the Shakespearean in "Original Spelling"
Dueling Shylocks
Shakespeare on Film: A Contrarian Argument
Three Giants
Peter Brook: The Search for the Secret Play
"You Can't Have Him, Harold!": The Battle over Bloom and Bloom's Falstaff
Stephen Booth: 777 Types of Ambiguity
Love, Beauty, Pleasure and Bad Weather in Bermuda
Looking for Love in As You Like It; Looking for an Orgasm in Romeo and Juliet
"No Cause": The Unexpected Pleasures of Forgiveness
Bibliographic Notes
Acknowledgments
Index

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