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Jewish Writings

ISBN-10: 0805211942
ISBN-13: 9780805211948
Edition: 2007
List price: $22.50 Buy it from $12.80
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Description: Although Hannah Arendt is not primarily known as a Jewish thinker, she probably wrote more about Jewish issues than any other topic. As a young adult in Germany, she wrote about German Jewish history. After moving to France in 1933, she helped  More...

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Book details

List price: $22.50
Copyright year: 2007
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 2/26/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 640
Size: 5.00" wide x 7.75" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

Although Hannah Arendt is not primarily known as a Jewish thinker, she probably wrote more about Jewish issues than any other topic. As a young adult in Germany, she wrote about German Jewish history. After moving to France in 1933, she helped Jewish youth immigrate to Palestine. During her years in Paris, her principle concern was the transformation of antinomianism from prejudice to policy, which would culminate in the Nazi "final solution." After France fell, Arendt escaped from an internment camp and made her way to America. There she wrote articles calling for a Jewish army to fight the Nazis. After the war, she supported the creation of a Jewish homeland in a binational (Arab-Jewish) state of Israel. Arendt's original conception of political freedom cannot be fully grasped apart from her experience as a Jew. In 1961 she attended Adolf Eichmann's trial in Jerusalem. Her report, "Eichmann in Jerusalem, "provoked an immense controversy, which culminated in her virtual excommunication from the worldwide Jewish community. Today that controversy is the subject of serious re-evaluation, especially among younger people in the United States, Europe, and Israel. The publication of "The Jewish Writings"-much of which has never appeared before-traces Arendt's life and thought as a Jew. It will put an end to any doubts about the centrality, from beginning to end, of Arendt's Jewish experience.

Born in Hanover, Germany, Hannah Arendt received her doctorate from Heidelberg University in 1928. A victim of naziism, she fled Germany in 1933 for France, where she helped with the resettlement of Jewish children in Palestine. In 1941, she emigrated to the United States. Ten years later she became an American citizen. Arendt held numerous positions in her new country---research director of the Conference on Jewish Relations, chief editor of Schocken Books, and executive director of Jewish Cultural Reconstruction in New York City. A visiting professor at several universities, including the University of California, Columbia, and the University of Chicago, and university professor on the graduate faculty of the New School for Social Research, in 1959 she became the first woman appointed to a full professorship at Princeton. She also won a number of grants and fellowships. In 1967 she received the Sigmund Freud Prize of the German Akademie fur Sprache und Dichtung for her fine scholarly writing. Arendt was well equipped to write her superb The Origins of Totalitarianism (1951) which David Riesman called "an achievement in historiography." In his view, "such an experience in understanding our times as this book provides is itself a social force not to be underestimated." Arendt's study of Adolf Eichmann at his trial---Eichmann in Jerusalem (1963)---part of which appeared originally in The New Yorker, was a painfully searching investigation into what made the Nazi persecutor tick. In it, she states that the trial of this Nazi illustrates the "banality of evil." In 1968, she published Men in Dark Times, which includes essays on Hermann Broch, Walter Benjamin, and Bertolt Brecht (see Vol. 2), as well as an interesting characterization of Pope John XXIII.

Preface: A Jewish Life: 1906-1975
A Note on the Text
Publication History
Introduction: The Jew as Pariah: The Case of Hannah Arendt (1906-1975)
The 1930s
The Enlightenment and the Jewish Question
Against Private Circles
Original Assimilation: An Epilogue to the One Hundredth
Anniversary of Rahel Varnhagen's Death
The Professional Reclassification of Youth
A Guide for Youth: Martin Buber
Some Young People Are Going Home
The Gustloff Trial
The Jewish Question
Antisemitism
The 1940s
The Minority Question
The Jewish War That Isn't Happening: Articles from Aufbau, October 1941-November 1942
Between Silence and Speechlessness: Articles from Aufbau, February 1943-March 1944
The Political Organization of the Jewish People: Articles from Aufbau, April 1944-April 1945
Jewish Politics
Why the Cremieux Decree Was Abrogated
New Leaders Arise in Europe
A Way toward the Reconciliation of Peoples
We Refugees
The Jew as Pariah: A Hidden Tradition
Creating a Cultural Atmosphere
Jewish History, Revised
The Moral of History
Stefan Zweig: Jews in the World of Yesterday
The Crisis of Zionism
Herzl and Lazare
Zionism Reconsidered
The Jewish State: Fifty Years After, Where Have Herzl's Politics Led?
To Save the Jewish Homeland
The Assets of Personality: A Review of Chaim Weizmann: Statesman, Scientist, Builder of the Jewish Commonwealth
Single Track to Zion: A Review of Trial and Error: The Autobiography of Chaim Weizmann
The Failure of Reason: The Mission of Bernadotte
About "Collaboration"
New Palestine Party: Visit of Menachem Begin and Aims of Political Movement Discussed
The 1950s
Peace or Armistice in the Near East?
Magnes, the Conscience of the Jewish People
The History of the Great Crime: A Review of Breviaire de la haine: Le III[superscript e] Reich et les juifs [Breviary of Hate: The Third Reich and the Jews]
The 1960s
The Eichmann Controversy: A Letter to Gershom Scholem
Answers to Questions Submitted
The Eichmann Case and the Germans: A Conversation with Thilo Koch
The Destruction of Six Million: A Jewish World Symposium
"The Formidable Dr. Robinson": A Reply
Afterword: "Big Hannah"-My Aunt
Acknowledgments
Index

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