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We Are Now the True Spaniards Sovereignty, Revolution, Independence, and the Emergence of the Federal Republic of Mexico, 1808-1824

ISBN-10: 0804778302
ISBN-13: 9780804778305
Edition: 2012
List price: $70.00
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Description: This book is a radical reinterpretation of the process that led to Mexican independence in 1821—one that emphasizes Mexico's continuity with Spanish political culture. During its final decades under Spanish rule, New Spain was the most populous,  More...

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Book details

List price: $70.00
Copyright year: 2012
Publisher: Stanford University Press
Publication date: 6/6/2012
Binding: Hardcover
Pages: 520
Size: 6.00" wide x 10.00" long x 1.50" tall
Weight: 2.398
Language: English

This book is a radical reinterpretation of the process that led to Mexican independence in 1821—one that emphasizes Mexico's continuity with Spanish political culture. During its final decades under Spanish rule, New Spain was the most populous, richest, and most developed part of the worldwide Spanish Monarchy, and most novohispanos (people of New Spain) believed that their religious, social, economic, and political ties to the Monarchy made union preferable to separation. Neither the American nor the French Revolution convinced the novohispanos to sever ties with the Spanish Monarchy; nor did the Hidalgo Revolt of September 1810 and subsequent insurgencies cause Mexican independence.It was Napoleon's invasion of Spain in 1808 that led to the Hispanic Constitution of 1812. When the government in Spain rejected those new constituted arrangements, Mexico declared independence. The Mexican Constitution of 1824 affirms both the new state's independence and its continuance of Spanish political culture.

Preface
A Note about America and Americans
Terms Used in the Text
Introduction
A Shared Political Culture
The Antiguo R�gimen
The Nature of Representation in New Spain
The Emergence of an American Identity
The Bourbon Reforms
The Collapse of the Spanish Monarchy
The Crisis of the Spanish Monarchy
The Effects of the Crisis in New Spain
The General Juntas of 1808
The First Golpe de Estado
The Events of 1809
The Emergence of Representative Government
The Elections to the Junta Central
The Instructions from New Spain
The Valladolid Conspiracy
Two Revolutions
The Political Revolution
Convening a Parliament
The Elections of Suplentes
Elections in New Spain
The Armed Revolution
The Baj�o
The Great Insurgency
Other Movements
The Nature of the 1810 Revolutions
The C�diz Revolution
The Cortes of C�diz
The American Question
The Constitution
The New Constitutional Order in America
The First Constitutional Elections
Elections in Mexico City
Elections in Yucat�n
Elections in Nueva Galicia
Elections in the Provincias Internas
Ayuntamiento Elections in New Spain
Elections to the Cortes and Provincial Deputation in New Spain
The New Constitutional Regime
The Constitutional Regime in Guadalajara
The Significance of the Constitutional Order
The Collapse of Constitutional Government
A Fragmented Insurgency
Counterinsurgency
Toward an Organized Insurgency
The Insurgency in the South
Puebla and Cuautla
The Government of the Nation
The Insurgent Regime in Oaxaca
The Collapse of the Suprema Junta
The Urban Conspirators
The Congress of Chilpancingo
The Continuing Insurgency
Separation
The Restoration
The Constitution Restored
The Second Constitutional Period in New Spain
The Cortes
The Plan of Iguala
The Treaty of C�rdoba
The Mexican Empire
The Rise of Iturbide to Prominence
The Sovereign Provisional Governing Junta
Elections to the Mexican Constituent Cortes
The Convocatoria
The Elections
The Mexican Cortes
The Junta Nacional Instituyente
The End of the Empire
The Formation of the Federal Republic
The Junta of Puebla
The Sovereign Cortes
Who Is Sovereign?
The Junta of Celaya
Jalisco, Zacatecas, and Oaxaca
The Second Constituent Congress
Conclusion
Notes
Sources
Index

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