Global Communications Since 1844 Geopolitics and Technology

ISBN-10: 0801860741
ISBN-13: 9780801860744
Edition: 1999
Authors: Peter J. Hugill
List price: $34.95
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Description: In World Trade since 1431, Peter Hugill showed how the interplay of technology and geography guided the evolution of the modern global capitalistic system. Now, in the successor to that widely acclaimed book, Hugill shifts the focus to  More...

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Book details

List price: $34.95
Copyright year: 1999
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date: 3/4/1999
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 304
Size: 7.00" wide x 10.00" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 1.386
Language: English

In World Trade since 1431, Peter Hugill showed how the interplay of technology and geography guided the evolution of the modern global capitalistic system. Now, in the successor to that widely acclaimed book, Hugill shifts the focus to telecommunications, once again demonstrating that those nations that best developed and marketed new technologies were the nations that rose to world power. Beginning with the advent of the telegraph in the 1840s, Hugill shows how each major change in transportation and communications technologies brought about a corresponding transformation from one world economy to another. British advances in international telegraphy after the American Civil War, for example, kept that nation just ahead of the United States in the communications race, a position it held until 1945. Hugill explains how such developments as aerial bombardment of cities in World War I spurred the development of radio and, ultimately, radar. He also traces the steps that led to the British surrender of world hegemony to the United States at the end of World War II. Praise for Peter Hugill's World Trade since 1431: "A magnificent work, Braudelian in its conception, scope, and attention to detail... A delight." -- Progress in Human Geography "A first-rate historical study in the genre of world history... Combines geography with the social sciences in skillful fashion. It is lucidly written and will appeal to the specialist and general reader." -- Virginia Quarterly Review "Hugill provides a refreshingly long historical sweep in arguing that transportation technologies have been the key to success in world trade... A wealth of historical and technical detail." -- Geonomics

List of Figures and Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Information Technology, Geopolitics, and the World-System
Telegraphy and the First Global Telecommunications Hegemony
"The Whole World Kin": Telephony and the Development of the Continental Polity to 1956
Radio Telegraphy, Radio Telephony, and Interstate Competition, 1896-1917
Challenges to British Telecommunications Hegemony: Continuous Wave Wireless
Military Uses of Radio Communication: The Development of Communications, Command, and Control
Communications, Command, and Control in the War in the Air: Radar, World War II, and the Slow Transition to American Power
Telecommunications and World-System Theory
Glossary
References
Name Index
Subject Index

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