Mass Communication and American Social Thought Key Texts, 1919-1968

ISBN-10: 0742528391
ISBN-13: 9780742528390
Edition: 2004
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Description: This anthology of hard-to-find primary documents provides a solid overview of the foundations of American media studies. Focusing on mass communication and society and how this research fits into larger patterns of social thought, this valuable  More...

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Book details

List price: $77.00
Copyright year: 2004
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date: 8/3/2004
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 552
Size: 6.75" wide x 9.50" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 2.706
Language: English

This anthology of hard-to-find primary documents provides a solid overview of the foundations of American media studies. Focusing on mass communication and society and how this research fits into larger patterns of social thought, this valuable collection features key texts covering the media studies traditions of the Chicago school, the effects tradition, the critical theory of the Frankfurt school, and mass society theory. Where possible, articles are reproduced in their entirety to preserve the historical flavor and texture of the original works. This text is ideal for upper-level courses in mass communication and media theory, media and society, mass communication effects, and mass media history. Visit our website for sample chapters!

Jane Addams was born Laura Jane Addams in Cedarville, Illinois, on September 6, 1860. She graduated from Rockford Female Seminary with the hope of attending medical school. Her father opposed her unconventional ambition and, in an attempt to redirect it, sent her to Europe. In London, Addams was moved by the work done at Toynbee Hall, a settlement house. Upon her return to the United States, she began her lifelong fight for the underprivileged, women, children laborers, and social reform. In the space of four years she received Yale University's first honorary doctorate awarded to a woman, published her first book, was the first woman president of the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, and was elected vice president of the National American Women Suffrage Association. In 1915 she became the first president of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. With Ellen G. Starr, Addams founded Hull House in Chicago, a renowned settlement house dedicated to serving the disadvantaged and the poor. Addams went on to author twelve books, including Twenty Years in Hull House, Newer Ideals of Peace, and Peace and Bread in Time of War. The latter title was written to protest the U.S.'s involvement in World War I and was based on Addams's experience assisting Herbert Hoover in sending relief supplies to women and children in enemy nations. Hospitalized following a heart attack in 1926, Addams could not accept in person the Nobel Peace Prize she was awarded in 1931. She was the first American woman to receive the honor. Addams died in 1935.

Introduction: Mass Communication and American Social Thought: Key Texts, 1919-1968
From Hope to Disillusionment: Mass Communication Theory Coalesces, 1919-1933
Introduction
"The Process of Social Change," from Political Science Quarterly (1897)
"The House of Dreams," from The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets (1909)
From Winesburg, Ohio (1919)
From the Introduction to the Science of Sociology (1921)
"Nature, Communication, and Meaning," from Experience and Nature (1925)
"The Disenchanted Man," from The Phantom Public (1925)
"Criteria of Negro Art," from Crisis Magazine (1926)
"The Results of Propaganda," from Propaganda Technique in the World War (1927)
"Manipulating Public Opinion: The Why and the How" (1928)
From Middletown: A Study in Contemporary American Culture (1929)
"Communication," from Encyclopaedia of the Social Sciences (1931)
The World in Turmoil: Communications Research, 1933-1949
Introduction
"Conclusion," from Movies and Conduct (1933)
"The Integration of Communication," from Communication Agencies and Social Life (1933)
"Toward a Critique of Negro Music," from Opportunity (1934)
From Technics and Civilization (1934)
"The Business Nobody Knows," from Our Master's Voice (1934)
"The Influence of Radio upon Mental and Social Life," from The Psychology of Radio (1935)
"Foreword," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1937)
"Human Interest Stories and Democracy," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1937)
From The Fine Art of Propaganda (1939)
"A Powerful, Bold, and Unmeasurable Party?" from The Pulse of Democracy (1940)
"Democracy in Reverse," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1940)
"Needed Research in Communication," from the Rockefeller Archives (1940)
"On Borrowed Experience: An Analysis of Listening to Daytime Sketches," from Studies in Philosophy and Social Science (1941)
"Art and Mass Culture," from Studies in Philosophy and Social Science (1941)
"Administrative and Critical Communications Research," from Studies in Philosophy and Social Science (1941)
"The Popular Music Industry," from Radio Research 1941 (1942)
From Dialectic of Enlightenment (1944)
"Nazi Propaganda and Violence," from German Radio Propaganda (1944)
"Biographies in Popular Magazines," from Radio Research 1942-1943 (1944)
"The Negro Press," from An American Dilemma: The Negro Problem and Modern Democracy (1944)
"A Social Critique of Radio Music," from the Kenyon Review (1945)
"The Social and Cultural Context," from Mass Persuasion (1946)
"The Requirements," from A Free and Responsible Press (1947)
"Mass Media," from UNESCO: Its Philosophy and Purpose (1947)
"The Enormous Radio," from The Enormous Radio and Other Stories (1947)
"Mass Communication, Popular Taste, and Organized Social Action," from The Communication of Ideas (1948)
Table from "Communication Research and the Social Psychologist," from Current Trends in Social Psychology (1948)
"Information, Language, and Society," from Cybernetics: Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine (1948)
"Consensus and Mass Communication," from American Sociological Review (1948)
"What 'Missing the Newspaper' Means," from Communications Research (1949)
The American Dream and Its Discontents: Mass Communication Theory, 1949-1968
Introduction
"Industrialism and Cultural Values," from The Bias of Communication (1950)
"Emerging from Magic," from Hollywood: The Dream Factory (1950)
"Storytellers as Tutors in Technique," from The Lonely Crowd (1950)
"Our Next Frontier...Transoceanic TV," from Look (1950)
"Communication in the Sovietized State, as Demonstrated in Korea," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1951)
"The Consumer's Stake in Radio and Television," from Quarterly of Film, Radio and Television (1951)
"The Unique Perspective of Television and Its Effect: A Pilot Study," from American Sociological Review (1952)
"Technology and Political Change," from International Journal (1952)
"A Theory of Mass Culture," from Diogenes (1953)
"Sight, Sound, and Fury," from Commonweal (1954)
"Between Media and Mass," from Personal Influence (1955)
"The Theory of Mass Society: A Critique," from Commentary (1956)
"Mass Communication and Para-Social Interaction: Observations on Intimacy at a Distance," from Psychiatry (1956)
"The Mass Society," from The Power Elite (1956)
"FDR and the White House Mail," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1956)
"Notes on a Natural History of Fads," from American Journal of Sociology (1957)
"Mass Communication and Socio-cultural Integration," from Social Forces (1958)
"Modernizing Styles of Life: A Theory," from The Passing of Traditional Society (1958)
"The Social-Anatomy of the Romance-Confession Cover Girl," from Journalism Quarterly (1959)
"The State of Communication Research," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1959)
"The State of Communication Research: Comments," from Public Opinion Quarterly (1959)
"What Is Mass Communication?" from Mass Communication: A Sociological Perspective (1959)
"Social Theory and Mass Media," from Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science (1961)
"Television and the Public Interest" (1961)
"The Kennedy Assassination and the Nature of Political Commitment," from The Kennedy Assassination and the American Public (1965)
"TV Overseas: The U.S. Hard Sell," from The Nation (1966)
"Aggressiveness in Advanced Industrial Societies," from Negations (1968)
Afterword and Acknowledgments
Other Readers and Historical Collections in American Mass Communication Study and Related Subjects
Suggested Films
Select Supplementary Reading List
The Intellectual History of North American Media Studies, 1919-1968: A Selected Bibliography (Including Works Cited in Interpretive Essays)
Credits
Index

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