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Passions and the Interests Political Arguments for Capitalism Before Its Triumph

ISBN-10: 0691160252
ISBN-13: 9780691160252
Edition: 1977 (Revised)
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Description: In this volume, Albert Hirschman reconstructs the intellectual climate of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to illuminate the intricate ideological transformation that occurred, wherein the pursuit of material interests--so long condemned as  More...

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Book details

List price: $14.95
Copyright year: 1977
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 10/6/2013
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 192
Size: 5.50" wide x 8.50" long x 0.75" tall
Weight: 0.660
Language: English

In this volume, Albert Hirschman reconstructs the intellectual climate of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to illuminate the intricate ideological transformation that occurred, wherein the pursuit of material interests--so long condemned as the deadly sin of avarice--was assigned the role of containing the unruly and destructive passions of man. Hirschman here offers a new interpretation for the rise of capitalism, one that emphasizes the continuities between old and new, in contrast to the assumption of a sharp break that is a common feature of both Marxian and Weberian thinking. Among the insights presented here is the ironical finding that capitalism was originally supposed to accomplish exactly what was soon denounced as its worst feature: the repression of the passions in favor of the "harmless," if one-dimensional, interests of commercial life. To portray this lengthy ideological change as an endogenous process, Hirschman draws on the writings of a large number of thinkers, including Montesquieu, Sir James Steuart, and Adam Smith.Featuring a new afterword by Jeremy Adelman and a foreword by Amartya Sen, this Princeton Classics edition of The Passions and the Interests sheds light on the intricate ideological transformation from which capitalism emerged triumphant, and reaffirms Hirschman's stature as one of our most influential and provocative thinkers.

Jeremy Adelman is the Walter Samuel Carpenter III Professor of Spanish Civilization and Culture and director of the Council for International Teaching and Research at Princeton University. His books include "Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: A History of the World" and "Sovereignty and Revolution in the Iberian Atlantic" (Princeton).

Foreword
Preface to the Twentieth Anniversary Edition
Acknowledgments
Introduction
How the Interests were Called Upon to Counteract the Passions
The Idea of Glory and Its Downfall
Man "as he really is"
Repressing and Harnessing the Passions
The Principle of the Countervailing Passion
"Interest" and "Interests" as Tamers of the Passions
Interest as a New Paradigm
Assets of an Interest-Governed World: Predictability and Constancy
Money-Making and Commerce as Innocent and Doux
Money-Making as a Calm Passion
How Economic Expansion was Expected to Improve the Political Order
Elements of a Doctrine
Montesquieu
Sir James Steuart
John Millar
Related yet Discordant Views
The Physiocrats
Adam Smith and the End of a Vision
Reflections on an Episode in Intellectual History
Where the Montesquieu-Steuart Vision Went Wrong
The Promise of an Interest-Governed World versus the Protestant Ethic
Contemporary Notes
Afterword
Notes
Index

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