Close Up, 1927-1933 Cinema and Modernism

ISBN-10: 0691004633
ISBN-13: 9780691004631
Edition: 1999
List price: $55.00 Buy it from $52.19
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Description: Close Upwas the first English-language journal of film theory. Published between 1927 and 1933, it billed itself as "the only magazine devoted to film as an art," promising readers "theory and analysis: no gossip." The journal was edited by the  More...

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Book details

List price: $55.00
Copyright year: 1999
Publisher: Princeton University Press
Publication date: 2/7/1999
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 352
Size: 6.75" wide x 10.00" long x 1.25" tall
Weight: 1.628
Language: English

Close Upwas the first English-language journal of film theory. Published between 1927 and 1933, it billed itself as "the only magazine devoted to film as an art," promising readers "theory and analysis: no gossip." The journal was edited by the writer and filmmaker Kenneth Macpherson, the novelist Winifred Bryher, and the poet H. D., and it attracted contributions from such major figures as Dorothy Richardson, Sergei Eisenstein, and Man Ray. This anthology presents some of the liveliest and most important articles from the publication's short but influential history. The writing inClose Upwas theoretically astute, politically incisive, open to emerging ideas from psychoanalysis, passionately committed to "pure cinema," and deeply critical of Hollywood and its European imitators. The articles collected here cover such subjects as women and film, "The Negro in Cinema," Russian and working-class cinema, and developments in film technology, including the much debated addition of sound. The contributors are a cosmopolitan cast, reflecting the journal's commitment to internationalism;Close Upwas published from Switzerland, printed in England and France, and distributed in Paris, Berlin, London, New York, and Los Angeles. The editors of this volume present a substantial introduction and commentaries on the articles that setClose Upin historical and intellectual context. This is crucial reading for anyone interested in the origins of film theory and the relationship between cinema and modernism.

Preface
Introduction: Reading Close Up, 1927-1933
Enthusiasms and Execrations
Introduction
As Is (July 1927)
British Solecisms
Emak Bakia
An Interview: Anita Loos
A New Cinema, Magic and the Avant Garde
The French Cinema
The Aframerican Cinema
The Negro Actor and the American Movies
From Silence to Sound
Introduction
The Sound Film: A Statement from U.S.S.R.
The Sound Film: Salvation of Cinema
Why 'Talkies' Are Unsound
As Is (October 1929)
The Contribution of H.D.
Introduction
The Cinema and the Classics
Beauty
Restraint
The Mask and the Movietone
Conrad Veidt: The Student of Prague
Expiation
Joan of Arc
Russian Films
An Appreciation
Continuous Performance: Dorothy Richardson
Introduction
Continuous Performance [unnumbered and untitled] (July 1927)
Musical Accompaniment
Captions
A Thousand Pities
There's No Place Like Home
The Increasing Congregation
The Front Rows
[Animal impudens ...] (March 1928)
The Thoroughly Popular Film
The Cinema in the Slums
Slow Motion
The Cinema in Arcady
Pictures and Films
Almost Persuaded
Dialogue in Dixie
A Tear for Lycidas
Narcissus
This Spoon-fed Generation?
The Film Gone Male
[untitled] (June 1933)
Dawn's Left Hand, reviewed
Borderline and the Pool Films
Introduction
Borderline: A POOL Film with Paul Robeson H.D.
As Is (November 1930)
Cinema and Psychoanalysis
Introduction
Mind-growth or Mind-mechanization? The Cinema in Education
Film Psychology
Freud on the Films
The Film in Its Relation to the Unconscious
Dreams and Films
Kitsch
Cinema Culture
Introduction
The Independent Cinema Congress
Russian Cutting
'This Montage Business'
First Steps Towards a Workers' Film Movement
Films for Children
What Can I Do?
How I Would Start a Film Club
A Note on Household Economy
Towards a Co-operative Cinema: The Work of the Academy, Oxford Street
Modern Witch-trials
Acts under the Acts
Fade
What Shall You Do in the War?
The Contents of Close Up, 1927-1933
Notes on the Contributors and Correspondents
Publishing History and POOL Books
A Chronology of Close Up in Context
Notes
Index

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