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Moral Demands of Memory

ISBN-10: 0521709725
ISBN-13: 9780521709729
Edition: 2008
Authors: Jeffrey Blustein
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Book details

Copyright year: 2008
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Publication date: 3/3/2008
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 386
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 1.00" tall
Weight: 1.342
Language: English

Acknowledgments
Preface
Memory as a Subject of Evaluative Inquiry
Elements of a morality or ethics of memory
Nietzsche on the misuses of memory
Monumental history and the influence of the past
Antiquarian history and nostalgia
The moderating role of critical history
A surfeit of memory
The dynamic of remembering and forgetting
Collective memory
Personal memory
Memory as obligation
Responsibilities of remembrance and taking responsibility for the past
Memory, identity, and responsibility
Going forward
Taking Responsibility for One's Own Past
A case example
Some preliminaries about taking responsibility
Three elements of taking responsibility for the past
Retrospective construction of meaning
Appropriation
Thematization
Interconnections
Applying the analysis: The case of psychopharmacology
Why we don't take responsibility for our past
Humility and taking responsibility for one's past
Self-forgiveness and taking responsibility for one's past
Concluding thoughts on memory
Doing Justice to the Past
A historical example: The Tulsa Race Riot of 1921
Types of groups
Collections
Socially unified groups and their importance
Organized groups
Collective responsibility for past wrongdoing
Senses of collective responsibility
Group identity over time
A note about "different people choices" and groups
Wronging groups
Making sense of the past: Reconstruction and complications
Responsibility and the construction of group identity
Collective guilt and shame
Doing justice to the past: The role of memory
Memory and the demand for recognition
Symbolic reparation and memory
Ethics, Truth, and Collective Memory
Memory and history/History and myth
Collective memory and individual memory
History, myth, and collective memory
The interplay of history and myth in collective memory
Margalit on the ethics and morality of memory
Morality and collective memory
Ethics and collective memory
Conclusion
The Responsibility of Remembrance
Raising the issues: Absent friends, deceased friends
Qualities and modes of remembering the dead
Evaluative attitudes and remembering the dead: The case of love
Consequentialism and an expressive account
Consequentialism
Expressivism
The moral imperative to remember: Three arguments
The rescue from insignificance view
The enduring duties view
The reciprocity view
The three views in tandem
Mourning and the death of parents
Rituals of remembrance
How long we must remember
Memory and Bearing Witness
Witnessing in the contemporary world
The concept of bearing witness
Testimonial authority
Address and audience
The need for testimony
Some typological remarks
Bearing witness to right and wrong, good and bad
The witness' relationship to wrongdoing
Bearing witness to one's convictions
The symbolic value of bearing witness
Witnessing, self-representation, and moral agency
Proxies and the authority to bear witness
Final thoughts
Select Bibliography
Index

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