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Food Aid after Fifty Years Recasting Its Role

ISBN-10: 0415701252
ISBN-13: 9780415701259
Edition: 2005
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Description: The 1954 Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act, effectively began the modern era of food aid. Over the past fifty years the lives of hundreds of millions of people worldwide have been improved. Despite this it remains one of the most  More...

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Book details

Copyright year: 2005
Publisher: Routledge
Publication date: 8/9/2005
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 336
Size: 6.00" wide x 9.00" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 1.100
Language: English

The 1954 Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act, effectively began the modern era of food aid. Over the past fifty years the lives of hundreds of millions of people worldwide have been improved. Despite this it remains one of the most misunderstood and controversial instruments of contemporary international policy. Food Aid After Fifty Years explores the motivations and modalities of food aid and examines issues which impinge on its effectiveness. The book utilizes analytical and empirical accounts of food aid to resolve key misunderstandings and explore long standing myths. An alternative strategy is presented for recasting food aid, making it more effective in alleviating poverty, hunger and vulnerability. Food Aid After Fifty Years provides a clear, comprehensive and current explanation of a wide range of issues surrounding food aid and its policy and operations and will prove vital to students of Development Economics and Development Studies and those working in thefield.

List of illustrations
Foreword
Acknowledgments
List of abbreviations
Introduction
The basics of food aid
Modest flows intended to make a big difference at the margin
The players in the food aid game
Food aid distribution modalities and channels
Conclusion
Donor-oriented food aid: the United States of America
US food aid programs
American farm policy and food aid
American food aid is primarily about feeding the hungry
Food aid is an effective form of support for American farmers
Food aid and American development assistance policy
American food aid is no longer driven by short-term self-interest
Multilateral and other bilateral donors
Canada
Europe
Other bilateral donors
Multilateral food aid
Conclusion
International regulatory mechanisms and trade disputes
International regulatory mechanisms
Food aid is wholly additional
Food aid and commerical food trade
Food aid builds long-term commercial export markets for donors
Genetically modified foods
Conclusion
So who benefits? The "iron triangle"
Domestic producers and processors
Maritime interests
Cargo preference laws ensure the viability of the US maritime industry
Nongovernmental organizations
Nongovernmental organizations are a progressive force in food aid
Conclusion
Edging towards a recipient-oriented food aid system
Changing views of food insecurity: from Malthus to Sen
A rights-based perspective to livelihoods approaches
Implications of rights-based approaches: standards and codes of conduct
Poverty traps and relief traps
Conclusion
The uses of food aid to address food insecurity
Acute humanitarian emergencies
Safety nets for vulnerability reduction and asset protection
Food aid for development
Monetization
Conclusion
The management of food aid in addressing food insecurity
Targeting
Food aid reliably reaches hungry people and only hungry people
Food aid reliably arrives when it is needed
Information systems and sources
Procurement, supply chain management, and reserves
Food availability shocks covary across countries within a region
A dollar spent on food aid is a dollar consumed by hungry people
Conclusion
Consequences of poor food aid management
Humanitarian impacts: nutrition and health
Distortions, disincentives, and dependency
Food aid creates dependency
Food aid necessarily hurts recipient country producer incentives
Conclusion
Recasting food aid's role: the general strategy
A strategy for reducing poverty, food insecurity, and undernutrition
The roles of food aid in an overall food security strategy
The roles of the main food aid actors
Conclusion
Recasting food aid's role: the particulars and the politics
International policy changes needed
Negotiate a new Global Food Aid Compact to replace the Food Aid Convention
Restore real global development assistance flows
United States policy changes needed
Negotiate reductions in outdated forms of food aid
Focus on quicker and more flexible emergency response
Eliminate unnecessary bureaucratic duplication
Within current budgets, adapt the resource to fit the application
Other bilateral donor policy changes needed
Recipient country government and community policy changes needed
Operational agency policy and programming changes needed
Improve the targeting of food aid
Use food aid only where it is appropriate
Getting there from here: the politics of reform
Convincing the NGOs
Conclusion
Glossary
Notes
Bibliography

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