Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

ISBN-10: 0393930254
ISBN-13: 9780393930252
Edition: 2009
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Description: The text is accompanied by a detailed introduction, an essay on the metrical form, the translator’s note, marginal glosses, and explanatory annotations to assist readers in the study of this canonical Arthurian romance. “Contexts” presents two  More...

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Book details

Copyright year: 2009
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company, Incorporated
Publication date: 11/24/2009
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 272
Size: 5.25" wide x 8.50" long x 0.50" tall
Weight: 0.814
Language: English

The text is accompanied by a detailed introduction, an essay on the metrical form, the translator’s note, marginal glosses, and explanatory annotations to assist readers in the study of this canonical Arthurian romance. “Contexts” presents two French tales of Sir Gawain and a passage from the Alliterative Morte Arthure , also translated by Marie Borroff, as well as three selections from the original Middle English poem. “Criticism” collects twelve interpretive essays on the poem’s central themes. Contributors include Alain Renoir, Marie Borroff, J. A. Burrow, A. Kent Hieatt, A. C. Spearing, W. A. Davenport, Piero Boitani, Ralph Hanna III, Lynn Staley Johnson, Jonathan Nicholls, Geraldine Heng, and Leo Carruthers. A Chronology of important historical and literary dates and a Selected Bibliography are also included.

Geoffrey Chaucer, one of England's greatest poets, was born in London about 1340, the son of a wine merchant and deputy to the king's butler and his wife Agnes. Not much is known of Chaucer's early life and education, other than he learned to read French, Latin, and Italian. His experiences as a civil servant and diplomat are said to have developed his fascination with people and his knowledge of English life. In 1359-1360 Chaucer traveled with King Edward III's army to France during the Hundred Years' War and was captured in Ardennes. He returned to England after the Treaty of Bretigny when the King paid his ransom. In 1366 he married Philippa Roet, one of Queen Philippa's ladies, who gave him two sons and two daughters. Chaucer remained in royal service traveling to Flanders, Italy, and Spain. These travels would all have a great influence on his work. His early writing was influenced by the French tradition of courtly love poetry, and his later work by the Italians, especially Dante, Boccaccio, and Petrarch. Chaucer wrote in Middle English, the form of English used from 1100 to about 1485. He is given the designation of the first English poet to use rhymed couplets in iambic pentameter and to compose successfully in the vernacular. Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is a collection of humorous, bawdy, and poignant stories told by a group of fictional pilgrims traveling to the shrine of St. Thomas a Becket. It is considered to be among the masterpieces of literature. His works also include The Book of the Duchess, inspired by the death of John Gaunt's first wife; House of Fame, The Parliament of Fowls, and The Legend of Good Women. Troilus and Criseyde, adapted from a love story by Boccaccio, is one of his greatest poems apart from The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer died in London on October 25, 1400. He was buried in Westminster Abbey, in what is now called Poet's Corner.

Introduction
The Metrical Forms
Translator's Note
The Translated Text of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Contexts
Sir Gawain in Middle English
The Green Knight Enters, lines 130-50
Sir Gawain's Shield, lines 619-39
The Gift of the Green Girdle, lines 1846-69
Two Old French Gavain Romances
The Knight of the Sword
The Mule without a Bridle
From the Alliterative Morte Arthure
Feast at Christmas
Criticism
Descriptive Technique in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
[The Challenge Episode: A Stylistic Interpretation]
[Recognition and Confession at the Green Chapel]
Sir Gawain: Pentangle, Luf-Lace, Numerical Structure
[The Hero and His Adventure]
Unlocking What's Locked: Gawain's Green Girdle
[Regenerative Time in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight]
[The Testing of Courtesy at Camelot and Hautdesert]
Feminine Knots and the Other Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
The Duke of Clarence and the Earls of March: Garter Knights and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Chronology
Selected Bibliography

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